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23
Apr

Online Content to make you a better COACH.

It is always tough to find time to get away from the facility and head down to AZ or Southern California for mentorships or workshops. Online content today pushes coaches and physical therapists to learn “systems” through the content their peers have created online. These websites listed below have content relatable because they educated and apply. Here are some of EDU’s favorites:

  1. EXOS
  2. MobilityWOD
  3. StrengthCoach
  4. SueFalsone.com
23
Sep

Fuel for Speed: ULTRASLIDE Slideboard for Skiing & Ice-Based Training

 With the onset of fall weather and only 137 days until the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, anticipation is mounting for some of the most popular competitions including skiing. The ULTRASLIDE Slideboard lends itself inherently well to off-ice training for athletes who compete in ice-based sports given the occasional limitations on access to ice. Skiing is no exception.
Marc Digesti,
Founder of PerformancEDU Training Facility
Marc Digesti, former U.S. Disabled Ski Team Strength Coach and Director of Performance of PerformancEDU Training Facility utilizes the ULTRASLIDE Slideboard for multiple diversified training programs in his in Tahoe, NV facility. Recently Marc shared his perspective on why the ULTRASLIDE is so effective for his skiers, elite athletes and more.

U: What is your experience with skiing?

M: I grew up in the Tahoe area ski racing until high school. After playing baseball in college and graduating with a degree in Exercise Physiology, I was hired as the Strength Coach for the U.S. Disabled Ski Team. In this role, I traveled, designed and implemented training methods for our athletes including testing protocols.

U: What are the most important training objectives for skiers in general?

M: The most important training objective is to get ski athletes powerful while not limiting their mobility and stability movement patterns. They need to be solid and strong but flexible to anticipate the changes in direction and terrain.

U: What are the most challenging training aspects for skiers?

M: The most challenging aspects of training skiers is their rigorous in-season travel schedule. We have to create a very objective periodization for their off-season dry land training. More importantly we have to create a program for their in-season maintenance. The ULTRASLIDE has been a perfect fit for meeting these needs given that it provides 24-7 access to a training mechanism and is versatile in function to support a variety of training needs. This one tool can address the needs of many.

U: Having incorporated the ULTRASLIDE Slideboard into your training and conditioning, do you find that it supports conditioning in one central area or multiple area(s)?

M: The ULTRASLIDE is a training tool we use for many areas of our training. It’s not just great for our metabolic systems with interval work and lateral sliding; we incorporate it into all of our upper and lower body mobility/stability movements and torso stability patterns (for the core).

U: What differences in performance did you notice after you began using the ULTRASLIDE in a more targeted way?

M: Based upon periodizing programs with and without loads on the upper body (using weight vests and med balls), our skiers were able to hold their turns with more power and stability.

U: Why do you think the ULTRASLIDE is most effective for skiers?

M: The ULTRASLIDE is the best training tool that mimics the lateral demands placed on the body while skiing. The slideboard bumpers are sturdy and allow the athlete to achieve speed and access the same force they leverage in competition. The bumpers really force the athlete to load their inside hip during the push-off which directly translates to loading the inside hip while initiating the turn in the true competitive environment.

U: What is your go-to exercise or routine when utilizing the ULTRASLIDE?

M: At PerformancEDU, one of our go to movements with the ULTRASLIDE are reverse loaded lunges. You get the best of both worlds for great single leg strength and upper body stability.
12
Sep

Fall Ski Performance Training at PerformancEDU is up and running.

Kim Mann Slayin it after PT Transition Program

Kim Mann Slayin it after PT Transition Program

Hailey Duke

Hailey Duke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is PerformancEDU Training Facility?

The primary goal of PerformancEDU Training Facility is to provide support the ambitions of our clients and athletes with the most effective training in the Reno/Tahoe area. Our methodology is assessment-driven, science-based, personalized and emphasizes a movement-based training methodology, which are periodized to prepare our clients and athletes for sport and life.

What Training Program is EDU offering?

Are you ready to prepare yourself for the upcoming ski season? PerformancEDU offers great results with our proven performance methodology for athletes;

  • In preparation for the ski season,

  • Programming for off-season intensive programs

  • And in-season maintenance programming

We have created a great community of local ski athletes ranging from FarWest to World Cup, ski instructors, ski patrol and master’s racers.

The dates have been set for our Ski Performance Dryland Training at EDU. We have 3 different groups running each day, here is a breakdown:

  1. FIS/FarWest Dryland Program:

    1. Monday through Thursday at 3 pm to 4 pm.

  2. FarWest/Tahoe League Dryland Program:

    1. Monday/Wednesday/ Thursday at 4 pm to 5 pm.

  3. Master’s Racers/Ski Patrol/Ski Instructor Dryland Program:

    1. Monday/Wednesday/Thursday at 5:30 to 6:30 pm.

What 4 phases of training do we cover during our Ski Performance Dryland Program?

  • Individualized Functional Movement and Athleticism Assessment (we uncover your weaknesses and needs)

  • Extensive 1  - Foundation Phase (Finding Stability)

  • Extensive 2  -  Maintain Strength and Revisit Stability

  • Intensive 1  - Absolute Strength

What does PerformancEDU’s Ski Performance Dryland Training program entail?

  • Intensive review of each athlete’s ambition(s), Functional Movement and Athleticism Assessment designed to identify weaknesses and needs.  This information in turn is used to develop a personalized program of improvement, periodized for progressive improvement.  A formal Reassessment is provided at the conclusion of Dryland Training.

  • Movement Preparation will increase proprioception and stabilization, decrease injury potential, improves focus and motor learning and balances the body prior to starting the dryland training program.

  • Corrective Movements (Pillar Strength) will address movement limitations identified during the FMS assessment.  If your body does not move well on the training floor, the same will be visible on skis.  By improving stability/mobility in your shoulders, trunk and hip, this will reduce the likelihood of injury, while increasing performance.

  • Power/Elastic Movements will emphasize increased forces through jumping, hopping and olympic movements that will relate to high speed carving, bumps and crud.

  • Strength Movements will emphasize functional movements in relationship to being on-hill. The strength program includes balance of hip-dominant, knee-dominant, anterior core, posterior core, rotational, upper body pulls (vertical/horizontal), and upper body pushes (vertical/horizontal) to make sure you are stable and strong in all directions. There is a single-leg emphasis to emphasize turns are strong and symmetrical.  Lateral strength work is specific for edging and pressured movements.

  • A combination of anaerobic and aerobic conditioning (ESD)  The ESD sessions build all energy systems (Cardio Base, Leg Strength, Sport Specific, Endurance, Recovery) so you will have the strength-endurance to perform on all areas of the mountain.

  • Foam rolling, static stretching and hydrotherapy is a necessity to help the body with recovery from on-hill training. Recovery is a crucial, yet it is often overlooked. In fact, recovery is an essential part of rebuilding muscle . Foam rolling can help to relieve build up fascia, which can limit the body to move properly. Static stretching helps to maintain, and even regain range of motion in joints and lengthening your muscles and fascia. Hydrotherapy includes warm and cold tubs. The warm water soothes tense muscles, while cool water stimulates internal activity. These three recovery tools together can help with overuse injuries, and on-hill performance from improved mobility.

What is the Cost?

Cost for 3 month commitment (per month):

  • 1 training session per week/4 per month: $100

  • 2 training session per week/8 per month: $200

  • 3 training session per week/12 per month: $280

Cost for Month to Month commitment (per month):

  • 1 training session per week/4 per month: $130

  • 2 training session per week/8 per month: $260

  • 3 training session per week/12 per month: $370

We are looking forward in hearing from you!

Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU Training Facility

 

11
Aug

Testimonial Spotlight: Grant Korgan

EDU Marc Digesti and Grant Korgan

EDU Marc Digesti and Grant Korgan

Marc Digesti of PerformancEDU Training Facility our of Reno is a world-class athlete development and body optimization master. This facility (and Marc’s skill set) is a huge asset to Reno/Tahoe area athletes and individuals who desire to achieve their optimal fitness results. Marc brings an exceptionally large knowledge base of the body and it’s connection with the mind to every session. Couple his dedication to the body’s physiology with a very calming and constant understanding of your big picture goals, and you have a very powerful teammate on your journey to heath and fitness success…

For the past 3 years, my wife (also my lead trainer / fitness guru) and I have been on a journey of constant recovery from a 2010 spinal cord injury. We have been blessed and honored to have been given the opportunity to train with some of the best practitioners and facilities around the nation. I give Performance EDU a five star rating because each week I work out with many practitioners (applying myself to many different healing modalities), and Marc has not only earned my respect – he has earned the respect of all others on my team.

I believe with my whole heart in 120% recovery, and from day one, Marc has believed with his whole heart as well. I put in the hard work everyday to make progress, and with the help of my team, my wife, the High Fives non-profit Foundation, an incredibly supportive community, and Marc Digesti / PerformancEDU – we move closer toward that goal every single day!!!

10
Aug

New and functionally IMPROVED PerformancEDU Training Facility

 

 

We are excited to share the improvements we have placed into PerformancEDU Training Facility in the past couple of weeks:

  • 700 sq feet of artificial turf designed for “the athlete” and elastic movements.
  • Functional Trainer from Keiser Equipment
  • Performance Trainer from Keiser Equipment
  • 3 medball racks holding up to 5 medballs on each
  • 8 spri matts
  • Accelaware strength and conditioning programing
  • PhysioTools for our corrective programing
  • 2 plyo boxes
  • Mini Kitchen for pre and post supplementation
  • Updated work station with labtop and swivel mounted monitor to display programs and corrective movements

We would like to take the opportunity to thank  everyone who was involved with updating #thefactory and making it more efficient for our EDU community.

PerformancEDU Training Facility

29
Jun

Athlete Testimonial: Hailey Duke

Hailey Duke

Hailey Duke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“To get me back on my feet Marc Digesti at PerformancEDU in Reno, Nevada has done a phenomenal  job. I have learned a lot about off-hill training over the years with and without the national team. I have taken in a lot of information and made every mistake out there as well. I am happy to say I found the training approach I have been looking for my entire career. Not many have the experience and training that Marc has and in addition have the ability to see the big picture to put it all together. If you are an athlete, a person plagued with injuries or just someone looking to feel better I suggest Marc at PerformancEDU. #MAKEITHAPPEN #skitosochi”

16
Jun

Performance Training for Tennis at PerformancEDU Training Facility

Malcolm Ridenour Tennis Pro

Malcolm Ridenour Tennis Pro

What is PerformancEDU Training Facility?

PerformancEDU Training Facility was created by Marc Digesti in January of 2010, with the goal of merging Performance and Education in the Reno/Tahoe area. The primary goal of PerformancEDU is to continue to provide its clients and athletes with the most effective training in the Reno/Tahoe area.  All of our programs emphasize a movement-based training methodology, which are periodized to prepare our clients and athletes for sport and life.

Who is Marc Digesti?

Specialties of PerformancEDU’s Marc Digesti: Marc is a Reno/Tahoe native. He received his bachelor of science degree in exercise physiology from Chico State University in 2004, and is certified as a USA weightlifting sports performance coach. Marc Digesti’s professional experience in the performance field includes serving as head strength coach for the U.S. Disabled Ski Team, a performance specialist for numerous top training facilities, trainer to pro NBA and NHL athletes, Performance Coach to World Cup, FIS, Junior National and Far-West Alpine Racers in the western division, Performance Coach for Independent Ski Racing Team and led numerous clinics on movement enhancement and quality.

Who is Malcolm Ridenour?

Malcolm has lived and coached in Tahoe for over 15 years.  He is a full time USPTA certified P1 Tennis Coach, working with recreational and highly competitive athletes of all ages.  Helped coach the Truckee high school boys team to 2012 State Championship finals runner up.  Has also worked with Easter Bowl participants.  Malcolm also had a very successful career as a PSIA-W Level 3/Examiner Alpine ski instructor in Tahoe.  Currently coaches at Tahoe Donner Tennis Center in Truckee, Ca.

What does PerformancEDU Tennis Performance Entail?

  • Movement Preparation will increase proprioception and stabilization, decrease injury potential, improves focus and motor learning and balances the body prior to starting the Tennis Performance Program.

  • Corrective Movements (Pillar Strength) will address movement limitations identified during the FMS screens.  If your body does not move well on the training floor, the same will be visible on the court.  By improving stability/mobility in your shoulders, trunk and hip, this will reduce the likelihood of injury, while increasing performance.

  • Power/Elastic Movements will emphasize increased forces through jumping, hopping and olympic movements that will relate to linear and lateral quickness.

  • Strength Movements will emphasize functional movements in relationship to being on the court. The strength program includes balance of hip-dominant, knee-dominant, anterior core, posterior core, rotational, upper body pulls (vertical/horizontal), and upper body pushes (vertical/horizontal) to make sure you are stable and strong in all directions. There is a single leg emphasis to emphasize strength and symmetry.  Lateral strength work emphasizing specific side to side movements.

  • A combination of anaerobic and aerobic conditioning (ESD).  The ESD sessions build all energy systems (Cardio Base, Leg Strength, Sport Specific, Endurance, Recovery) so you will have the strength-endurance to perform on all areas on the court.

  • Foam rolling, static stretching and hydrotherapy is a necessity to help the body with recovery from on court training. Recovery is crucial, yet it is often overlooked. In fact, recovery is an essential part of rebuilding muscle . Foam rolling can help to relieve build up fascia, which can limit the body to move properly. Static stretching helps to maintain, and even regain range of motion in joints and lengthening your muscles and fascia. Hydrotherapy includes warm and cold tubs. The warm water soothes tense muscles, while cool water stimulates internal activity. These these three recovery tools together can help with overuse injuries on and off the court.

What is the cost?

  • Sessions will be running 2 times per week (TBA) for 60 minutes on Tuesday and Thursdays at 6pm.

  • 2 training session per week/8 per month running for 6 weeks

  • Cost $30 per session. If purchasing package in full (12 sessions), $25 per session and totaling $300. Savings of $60.

We are looking forward in hearing from you!

Regards,

Marc Digesti USAW | Founder of PerformancEDU Training Facility

Director of Performance

6459 South Virginia St.

Reno, NV 89511

W:775.453.0319

F:775.344.0133

mdigesti@performancedu.com

12
Jun

Check out what EDU is adding to its Keiser Line-up.

PerformancEDU Training Facility is excited to announce the additions to existing Keiser footprint. We are adding another Performance Trainer to our movement wall and going to floor mount a Functional Trainer with a Power display to measure power output and wattage.

Check em out below!

PERFORMANCE TRAINER

Summary:
The Performance Trainer is a single-column, high-low pulley system. It incorporates all the benefits of the Infinity Series. It is designed to be wall mounted or can be used as multiple units in our Infinity Series Six Pack configuration. Many gyms mount the Performance Trainer units on walls and configure them into individual stations within cable training zones.

Technical Information:
Height:
87″ / 2210 mm
Width:
24″ / 610 mm
Length:
12″ / 305 mm
Weight:
120 lbs / 54 kg
Resistance Range:
0 – 80 lbs / 0 – 36 kg
Cable Length:
108″ / 2743 mm

FUNCTIONAL TRAINER

Summary:
The Functional Trainer represents the core machine within the Infinity Series. As the name implies, it is a multi-functional machine for a complete body workout. It can be used for hundreds of different exercises, ranging from rehabilitation to sports-specific applications and is one of the most basic and versatile cable machines available. The Functional Trainer incorporates two adjustable arms, which accommodate high/low training positions. The ability to train at any speed and without any impact makes it the product of choice for many different applications. With its space-saving design, the unit is available with or without a base. (Units without base must be bolted directly and securely to the floor.)

Technical Information:
Height (With Base):
93″ / 2362 mm (Arms up) 62 ” / 1574.8 mm (Arms down)
Width (With Base):
94″ / 2387.6 mm (Arms out) 84″ / 2133.6 mm (Base width)
Depth:
48″ / 1219.2 mm
Weight (With Base):
300 lbs / 136 kg
Weight (Floor Mounted):
130 lbs / 59 kg
Resistance Range:0 – 106 lbs / 0 – 48 kg Bilaterally | 0 – 53 lbs Unilaterally
Cable Length:
144″ / 3658 mm (Unilaterally)
72″ / 1829 mm (Bilaterally)

Previous
6
Jun

Want to know about PerformancEDU Training Facility?

EDU Marc Digesti and Grant Korgan

EDU Marc Digesti and Grant Korgan

Marc Digesti | Director of Performance

Marc Digesti | Director of Performance

PerformancEDU Training Facility was created by Marc Digesti in January of 2010, with the goal of merging Performance and Education in the Reno/Tahoe area. The primary goal of PerformancEDU is to continue to provide its clients and athletes with the most effective training in the Reno/Tahoe area. All of our programs emphasize a movement-based training methodology, which are periodized to prepare our clients and athletes for sport and life.

Since opening the doors in 2012, PerformancEDU Training Facility has touched over 400 lives through training.  PerformancEDU has presented to Reno Fire and Police Dept on injury prevention and Northstar Ski School on integration of the Functional Movement Screen into programing. PerformancEDU has directed and consulted for: North America Ski Training Center, Sky Tavern Alpine Team, Reno Police Dept, Moment Ski Company, Galena Volleyball Program, and Reno High Baseball Program, Independent Ski Racing Team.  PerformancEDU has written Ski Specific content for Stack Magazine, Ski Magazine and TRX Training for the past 9 months.

Specialties of PerformancEDU’s Marc Digesti: Marc is a Reno/Tahoe native. He received his bachelor of science degree in exercise physiology from Chico State University in 2004, and is certified as a USA weightlifting sports performance coach. Marc Digesti’s professional experience in the performance field includes serving as head strength coach for the U.S. Disabled Ski Team, a performance specialist for numerous top training facilities, trainer to pro NBA and NHL athletes, Performance Coach to World Cup, FIS, Junior National and FarWest Alpine Racers in the western division, Performance Coach for Independent Ski Racing Team and led numerous clinics on movement enhancement and quality.

  • Head Strength Coach for US Disabled Ski Team

  • Consultant

    • US Disabled Developmental Team

    • Team Serbia Disabled Team member

    • Team Britain Disabled Team member

  • Performance Specialist at Todd Durkin Enterprise

  • Performance Specialist at Core Performance Center/Athletes Performance

  • Founder of PerformancEDU Training Facility

  • Performance Director for Sky Tavern Alpine/Freestyle Team

  • Movement Coach for Reno High Baseball

  • Contributing writer for Stack Mag and TRX Ski Specific Programing Content

  • Head Performance Coach for Independent Ski Racing Team

  • Type of Athletes trained:

    • Professional Triathletes

    • Minor League Soccer

    • NBA Players

    • NHL Players

    • Minor and Major League/College Baseball Players

    • Disabled Alpine Ski Team

    • Bill Flemming (Squaw Big Mountain Skier)

    • Michelle Parker (Pro Freeride)

    • Grant Korgan/Korg 3.0

    • Reno Police/SWAT Team

    • FMScreening for Northstar Ski School

    • High School Athletes (all sports)

    • Semi Professional Cyclists

    • Assisted in NFL Combine Players
28
May

What does PerformancEDU Summer Dryland Program Entail?

Hailey Duke

Hailey Duke

 

Kim Mann Slayin it after PT Transition Program

Kim Mann Slayin it after PT Transition Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is PerformancEDU Training Facility?

PerformancEDU Training Facility was created by Marc Digesti in January of 2010, with the goal of merging Performance and Education in the Reno/Tahoe area. The primary goal of PerformancEDU is to continue to provide its clients and athletes with the most effective training in the Reno/Tahoe area. All of our programs emphasize a movement-based training methodology, which are periodized to prepare our clients and athletes for sport and life.

What Training Program is EDU offering?

Are you ready to prepare yourself for the upcoming ski season? PerformancEDU Training Facility has had great results the past three years with our methodology leading up to the ski season, while programing for off-season intensive programs and in-season maintenance program for each of our athletes.  We have created a great community of local ski athletes ranging from FarWest to World Cup,  ski instructors, ski patrol and master’s racers.

The dates have been set for our Dryland Training at EDU. Sessions are scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 3 pm till 4 pm.

What 3 phases of training do we cover during our Dryland Program?

  • Extensive 1 Foundation Phase (Finding Stability)
  • Extensive 2 Maintain Strength and Revisit Stability
  • Intensive 1 Absolute Strength

What does PerformancEDU’s Summer Dryland Training program entail?

  • Movement Preparation will increase proprioception and stabilization, decrease injury potential, improves focus and motor learning and balances the body prior to starting the dryland training program.
  • Corrective Movements (Pillar Strength) will address movement limitations identified during the FMS screens.  If your body does not move well on the training floor, the same will be visible on skis.  By improving stability/mobility in your shoulders, trunk and hip, this will reduce the likelihood of injury, while increasing performance.
  • Power/Elastic Movements will emphasize increased forces through jumping, hoping and olympic movements that will relate to high speed carving, bumps and crud.
  • Strength Movements will emphasize functional movements in relationship to being on-hill. The strength program includes balance of hip-dominant, knee-dominant, anterior core, posterior core, rotational, upper body pulls (vertical/horizontal), and upper body pushes (vertical/horizontal) to make sure you are stable and strong in all directions. There is a single leg emphasis to emphasize turns are strong and symmetrical.  Lateral strength work is specific for edging and pressured movements.
  • A combination of anaerobic and aerobic conditioning (ESD)  The ESD sessions build all energy systems (Cardio Base, Leg Strength, Sport Sepcific, Endurance, Recovery) so you will have the strength-endurance to perform on all areas of the mountain.
  • Foam rolling, static stretching and hydrotherapy is a necessity to help the body with recovery from on-hill training. Recovery is a crucial, yet it is often overlooked. In fact, recovery is an essential part of rebuilding muscle . Foam rolling can help to relieve build up fascia, which can limit the body to move properly. Static stretching helps to maintain, and even regain range of motion in joints and lengthening your muscles and fascia. Hydrotherapy includes warm and cold tubs. The warm water soothes tense muscles, while cool water stimulates internal activity. These these three recovery tools together can help with overuse injuries, and on-hill performance from improved mobility.

What is the Cost?

Cost for 3 month commitment Monthly:

  • 1 training session per week/4 per month: $100
  • 2 training session per week/8 per month: $200
  • 3 training session per week/12 per month: $280
  • 4 training session per week/16 per month: $320

Cost for Month to Month Commitment Monthly:

  • 1 training session per week/4 per month: $120
  • 2 training session per week/8 per month: $220
  • 3 training session per week/12 per month: $300
  • 4 training session per week/16 per month: $360

We are looking forward in hearing from you!

Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU Training Facility

 

 

16
May

Why is our BOOTIE (glutes) important?

When coming into PerformancEDU Training Facility, one of the first things we breakdown is glute activation (which means, how do we get our bootie on fire).  After studying McGill and Clark, they put this in perspective through simple questions and an easy answer:  Are the glutes weak because the psoas is tight, or is the psoas tight because the glutes are weak? It may be a classic interdependent, chicken-and-egg scenario. Either way, proper strengthening of the glutes will be the best cure.Boyle, Michael (2011-12-05). Advances in Functional Training (Kindle Locations 2024-2026). On Target Publications. Kindle Edition.

Being able to remedy non firing glute function, the client first needs to activate the core. This can be done in a quadruped position so we are not able to fire the hamstrings down to the calves.  Great description said by Shirley Sahrmann: Sahrmann describes the biomechanical explanation by citing the lower insertion point of the hamstrings on the femur. If the hamstrings are consistently called upon to be the primary hip extensor, the result will be anterior hip pain in addition to hamstring strains. The anterior hip pain is a result of the poor angle of pull of the hamstrings when used as a hip extensor. Boyle, Michael (2011-12-05). Advances in Functional Training (Kindle Locations 2031-2034). On Target Publications. Kindle Edition.

We see more and more injuries due to the inability to fire the glutes, which will lead to these types of injuries:

• Low back pain relates to poor glute max activation, with poor glute function causing excessive lumbar compensation.

• Hamstring strains relate to poor glute max activation.

• Anterior hip pain relates to poor glute max activation. This relates to the poor biomechanics of hamstrings as hip extensors.

• Anterior knee pain relates to poor glute medius strength or activation.

At PerformancEDU Training Facility we perform glute activation at the beginning of every session to develop awareness of the glutes, but more importantly turn them on for the upcoming training session.

 Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU

15
May

PerformancEDU loves loading AIR: Great article on Keiser EQ!

IRON VS. AIR: WHY PNEUMATIC RESISTANCE MIGHT BE THE NEXT BIG THING

Fitness

on

May 14, 2013

SHARES

272

Keiser Bikes APSDPhotos by Jason Kirby

Over thirty years ago in a small factory in Frenso, a pair of brothers set out to make pumping iron passé. The product that emerged had no weights, pins, or pulleys; the resistance came entirely from compressed air, or pneumatics. By 1978, the Keiser brothers were peddling the world’s first air-powered variable resistance machines.

To no surprise, the technology’s earliest adopters included Olympic and professional sports teams, along with some of the country’s leading performance training facilities. Today, Athletes’ PerformancePeak PerformanceMike Boyle Strength and Conditioning, and LA Fitness are just a few of the big name facilities buying into the air-powered equipment. The U.S. Armed Forces (Navy SEALs and Special Forces included), physical therapy facilities, and nursing homes are also incorporating pneumatic resistance into their training routines — with no real competitors in sight. According to Keiser reps, sales of Keiser’s pneumatic cable pulley systems and racks have increased by 68 percent over the last three years.

THE AIR ADVANTAGE

So why swap traditional stacked weights for the unseen? “Pneumatic machines are the closest you’ll get to true isotonic exercise,” (or moving a fixed amount of resistance through a specific range of motion), says Andrea Hudy, strength and conditioning coach at the University of Kansas.

Of course, moving a barbell or a stack of weights might appear to accomplish the same thing, but there’s actually a whole lot more at play. Inertia, acceleration, and other factors (like friction from cams and pulleys) can cause the amount of force on the body to change at various points throughout the movement. For a barbell bench press, for example, if you push the weight fast for the first half of the move, the barbell will become lighter, perhaps even weightless, during the second half of the motion due to momentum. By comparison, with pneumatic resistance, no matter how fast you move, the resistance stays the same.

Equipped with a 2 ½-inch wide cylinder of compressed air, each pneumatic machine can produce up to 500 pounds of force with only three pounds of actual moving weight. The result: a more consistent and controlled resistance compared to free weights or weight machines [1] [2].

As for the mechanics at play, it’s surprisingly simple: When you depress the right thumb button (+), air flows from the compressor to the cylinder. The longer you hold the button down, the more air flows into the cylinder, increasing the force it produces.

Keiser SquatDon’t expect an easy-breezy workout, though. Because pneumatic resistance is uniform, key stabilizers can’t go to sleep as the weight begins to accelerate, says Tristan Rice, Performance Manager at Athletes’ Performance San Diego. “Those muscles have to remain active and engaged throughout the entire range of motion, throughout a range of velocities.” In the long-term, Rice says, “that can set you up for a reduced incidence of injury,” (though, because all training involves a certain amount of stress on the body, no form of training is entirely injury-proof, of course).

But perhaps the biggest benefit of air training is speed. 

“Athletes can suddenly train [closer to] the speed they would perform at,” says Dan Taylor, Director of Global Communications at Keiser Corporation. With pneumatic resistance, explosive movements can be replicated at game-speed, conditioning the muscles to fire faster. “Train slow, be slow,” as the saying goes.

So while a golfer might try to strengthen their stroke with a woodchopper exercise, moving a traditional stack of weights up the cable column can only happen so quickly. Pneumatic resistance, on the other hand, would allow that same athlete to reach speeds closer to what they’d hit on the fairway. Air adds up when it’s time for NFL Combine training, too. At Athletes’ Performance, everything from air-resistance squats to air-powered cycling has helped the bottom line — faster 40s and higher verticals included, Rice says.

Measurable feedback is also a plus. Instead of speculating how fast a movementlooks, Keiser machines display a power output corresponding to each rep, allowing athletes and trainers to quantify — and track — power in real time. Once those starting points are accurately measured and accessed, then the true work can commence.

Of course, power isn’t the only advantage to working with air. Resistance on pneumatic machines is selected by the push of button, instead of by loading heavy plates or reaching down to adjust a pin in a weight stack (less ideal for older or injured trainees). Resistance is also available in more precise increments, down to the ounce.

Keiser has some safety benefits, too, such as being able to hit the ( – ) button mid-rep if the load feels too heavy. The uniform resistance also helps eliminate higher impact loads experienced on the connective tissues and joints while starting and stopping a traditional weighted movement. Still, it’s important to note that impact isn’t necessarily a bad thing: “It’s crucial to our survival, health, and optimal bone mass,” says Peak Performance trainer Jonathan Angelilli. The tricky part is making sure impact is increased properly, Angelilli says.

RESISTING AIR RESISTANCE

Keiser CableStill, pneumatic training isn’t for everyone. Though 29 MLB teams and about two-thirds of NBA, NHL, and NFL teams train with Keiser products, according to Taylor, many high-level programs aren’t in a rush to change things up. The Kansas Jawhawks, for example, are sticking to Hudy’s ground-based weight training program.

“It’s not necessarily that these newer forms of training aren’t valuable to our guys,” Hudy says. “We have an evolving program, but the foundations of the exercises — the clean, jerk, Olympic snatch, squat, front squat — those never change.” Of the handful of Keiser machines in the KU weight room, athletes use them for rotational exercises — and not much else, she says.

By the same token, it’s unlikely powerlifters, Olympic lifters, and CrossFit athletes would gravitate toward a program that abandoned iron altogether. At the end of the day, competitive lifters will always need to be comfortable moving traditional weights. That’s not to say that pneumatic resistance couldn’t be beneficial as a supplemental form of training. With potentially less high-shock impact than traditional forms of weight training, working in some airtime might not be a bad thing. “If people are looking for variety or variability in a program, pneumatic is great,” Hudy says.

As for big box gyms, cost may be the biggest limitation. While LA Fitness and a number of boutique fitness studios across the U.S. have begun stocking spin rooms with Keiser’s $1,695 M3 Indoor Cycle, an air-powered spin bike, it’s hard to say if other chains will follow suit. Keiser Vice President Darrin Pelkey credits an increase in sales of the company’s second best-selling model, the Functional Trainer, to a recent influx of fitness studios. The multi-functional cable machine starts at $2,955.

Budgets aside, whether or not a facility will invest in pneumatic training comes down to education, Rice says. “As training theory and knowledge becomes disseminated across a much wider field, you’re going to see better availability in more gyms and more places,” Rice says. “That is, ultimately, where the big box gyms are going to go.”

COMING UP FOR AIR — THE TAKEAWAY

Until then, is compressed air worth seeking out? If there’s a machine within reach, pneumatic resistance is definitely worth a try (provided you’re healthy, injury-free, and have an experienced professional to show you the ropes). Though it’s still relatively new in the grand scheme of performance training, it appears there’s always something to be learned from the pros and a technology they’ve made their own over the last 30-plus years. Best-case scenario, we get faster, stronger, and maybe even better at what we do. Worst case, we walk away with a power output to use as a benchmark for improvement. And that’s never just a load of hot air.

15
May

#madluv collaboration with EDU

Here at EDU we get welcomed with #greatness, #energy and #madluv 4-5 times per week by 3 amazing individuals…….Grant, Shawn and OBIEONE!

The path has been set, the goals are creeping closer and the work is being put in. We are so ready for the challenge Grant, Shawna and I have set.  Lets ROLL!

Here is a little background of Grant and Shawna through their website, Facebook, Youtube and their book 2 feet back.

Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU

13
May

Why are my hips so TIGHT?

hip-pain-hip-flexorGray Cook says it best: Hip mobility is something we loose. As infants we are born with crazy hip mobility. Watching my little nephew Enzo put his feet in his mouth, and roll into a full squat with his bootie touching the ground is truly amazing to watch as a performance coach, but lets be real, we loose this very quickly.  We tend to be very long and week on our backside muscles, and very short and strong on our front side.  We see this a lot with our executive types of clientele which sit for excessive amounts of time. This will place the spine into flexion, which will make the glutes long and weak.  This is what causes all of us to have tight hip flexors.

 

 

What causes the muscles to be tight?

  1. Soft Tissue Mobility Restrictions
  2. Muscular Restrictions
  3. Capsular Restrictions
  4. Muscular Mobility
  5. Limited Range of Motion
  6. Lack of extension for the Glute to fire in the Hip
  7. Lack of flexion in the Psoas

How can we work on these limitations?

  1. Static Stretching
  2. Active Stretching-Low Loading

Remember…….if we can get stability in our core, this will allow us to gain active hip mobility.

 Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU

12
May

What is the “Core” and how do we Stabilize it?

2013-05-09 14.31.18

Grant Korgan Single Arms Stability Pushouts

It is almost certain every athlete or client which comes in during their initial evaluation always has a goal of getting a “six pack” or a strong core. Usually their knowledge of the “core” stems from what they are told from their coaches or from what they have read in health and fitness magazines. We always like to challenge our clients and athletes to the “how’s and why’s” to each and every session, this includes the initial evaluation. We usually as this question “what is your definition of a strong core?”  Typical client responses:

  • Ability to do 100 crunches
  • Planking for 10 minutes
  • Having 6 pack abs

There is so much going into the core (terminology, movements, progressions, understanding the anterior and posterior core), but I am just going to stick with the basics and describe what the core is designed for.  Lets define core stability, it is the ability to create movement in the arms (upper extremities) and legs (lower extremities) with out compensating the spine and or pelvis into movement.  “In the broadest sense allowing force to move from the ground through the hips, spine or scapulothoracic joints without energy leaks. Energy leaks are defined as points at which energy is lost during the transfer of force from the ground, and are a result of the body’s inability to stabilize a particular joint. Torso strength encompasses core stability, hip stability and shoulder stability, and most importantly, the ability to move force from the ground to the extremities while maintaining stability in the aforementioned areas (Boyle, Michael (2011-12-05). Advances in Functional Training).”

Core training goes much deeper than non weight bearing crunches and having six pack abs. Its the ability to relate body weight and load bearing movements while being able to create stability in a safe and effective manner.

 

Marc Digesti | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU

30
Apr

EDU Athlete Spotlight: Grant Korgran in SF Chronicle

Paralyzed athlete Grant Korgan achieves polar goal

Tom Stienstra, Chronicle Outdoors Writer
Published 4:00 am, Sunday, January 29, 2012
EDU Marc Digesti and Grant Korgan

EDU Marc Digesti and Grant Korgan

 

  • Grant Korgan,  and Tal Fletcher pushiung day after day Photo: Keoki Flagg, ©Keoki Flagg 2012
    Grant Korgan, and Tal Fletcher pushiung day after day Photo: Keoki Flagg, ©Keoki Flagg 2012

Two winters after being paralyzed from the waist down, Grant Korgan found his redemption this month on a minus-45-degree day at the South Pole.

With a few final thrusts of his ski poles, Korgan pushed his body the last 10 yards of a 75-mile, 12-day trek across the 9,000-foot Polar Plateau.

Korgan, who before his injury split his time between Stanford and Lake Tahoe, is the first paralyzed, or adaptive, athlete to reach the South Pole.

The real journey, he says, has been one of his soul, a salvation where he emerged on top after 22 months of recovery, physical therapy, introspection and training shared with close friends and trekkers, Tal Fletcher of Marin County and Doug Stoup of Truckee, and his wife and trainer, Shawna Korgan.

“I feel like everything happens for us, not to us,” Grant Korgan said. “You can decide what you want, that you choose the direction you want to go. That’s been the key for me, focusing on what I want, regardless of circumstances. The situation I face never sways me from the direction I want to go.”

Korgan, 34, was a scientist, working at Stanford as a mechanical engineer in the university’s nano-mechanics labs and spending most of his time as a world-class kayaker, snowmobiler and global adventurer. In the flash of a tiny mistake, the life he knew ended.

Third jump goes awry

In March 2010, Korgan was called from Stanford into the Sierra Nevada, in remote national forest south of Sonora Pass, to make a series of epic snowmobile jumps for a movie.

“The first jump of the day was about 140 feet, just an amazing, gorgeous jump,” Korgan said. “The second jump was a 100-foot fall-way, a hip jump where you change your course in the air and land on a different slope.

“The third jump, the second I left the lip, I knew I gave it a little too much speed, by maybe a half a mile per hour, and I was going to overshoot my landing spot. Felt like I had minutes in the air up there. Knew I was going to break bones. Had to figure out which bones to break. Braced myself for the hit.”

He shifted his position to the left side of the snowmobile so his leg and femur would absorb the brunt of the landing, Korgan said, and not his back. Instead, the spinal compression from the impact shattered his first lumbar vertebrae with such force that doctors called it a burst fracture.

“It was instant, as if something flipped a switch,” Korgan said. “It felt like a warm sack of hot metal BBs were attached below my belly button.”

An examination of his tracks showed that Korgan flew his snowmobile more than 100 feet in the air and overshot the landing site by only 2 feet.

In the hospital, doctors established that Korgan was paralyzed.

Wife Shawna, alerted by paramedics in the rescue helicopter, rushed to the hospital to be with her husband, she recounted: “I took his face in my hands, looked him in the eyes, and said, ‘It’s going to be OK. We’re not just going to survive this, we’re going to thrive through this. We’re going to keep every dream we’ve ever had. We’ll hike, bike, kayak, ski. All of our dreams are still happening. Don’t you change a single one of them.’ “

Recovery begins

Korgan spent nine days in an intensive care unit, another 30 days in an inpatient rehab hospital. Shawna, with a degree in health ecology and 15 years in the fitness industry, including five operating a wellness center, became his personal trainer. Therapy turned into recovery. He tried everything to regain use of his legs: multiple physical therapies, acupuncture Pilates, yoga and hyperbarics, a form of oxygen therapy during which he was placed in an atmospheric pressure chamber.

“I started with zero feeling, no movement below my belly button,” Korgan said. “Yes, I had a prognosis (to never walk unassisted again). I chose very powerfully to recover, no matter what the odds.” In the past six months, Korgan has been able to feel his thighs down to his knees, though he has no sensation below his knees or in his hamstrings.

This past summer, with Stoup, the world’s most traveled polar explorer, and Fletcher, a world-class helicopter ski guide, plans for an expedition to the South Pole began to take shape. Training for Antarctica became a mission. The expedition team called it “The Push.” In July, with another adaptive athlete, John Davis, a two-time Paralympics gold medalist, Korgan paddled his kayak 50 miles in four days on the Lake Tahoe Water Trail. The team set out on a series of mini expeditions that included treks in Alaska, the Arctic, Lake Tahoe and Patagonia.

Word about Korgan and his personal mission circulated in the outdoors industry. A book deal was in the works. The Truckee-based High Fives Foundation, which supports adaptive athletes in winter sports, awarded Korgan a grant for the expedition and provided money for therapy. A film crew came together to capture the drama. At the same time, a sit-ski, similar to a mountain bike on skis, was designed that consisted of a seat on a welded frame bolted to a pair of 6-foot Volkl backcountry skis.

On Jan. 5, the team landed on the Union Glacier in Antarctica, and the next day, bumped up to the Polar Plateau at an altitude of 9,000 feet, that is, atop ice that is nearly 2 miles thick.

On his sit-ski, after the first 10 pushes, Korgan stopped abruptly, Stoup recounted. Pushing his sit-ski across the Antarctic ice felt like crossing Velcro, he told Stoup, and he couldn’t believe the effort it required. They towed 6 1/2-foot sleds loaded with 180 pounds worth of food, fuel and survival gear.

“There was some doubt in my mind he could complete the journey,” Stoup said. “The first 10 pushes were very hard. It hit me right away that it would take him a herculean effort to do it 12 days in a row, 10 hours a day.”

Daunting conditions

Many call the South Pole the most inhospitable place on Earth. For this expedition, temperatures loomed in the minus-mid-30s to as low as the minus-mid-50s pushed by winds of 20 to 30 knots. Whiteouts enveloped the team for three days and half of a fourth, turning progress and navigation into acts of faith.

Because Korgan cannot feel his feet, Fletcher monitored Korgan’s foot temperatures with instruments and used thermal socks with batteries and down booties to keep them warm and protect against frostbite. They also wore vapor-wicking poly-based and SmartWool underwear, multiple layers of cold-weather gear, including 800-fill goose down vests, jackets and pants, and survival-suit shells.

The team worked best when Stoup was out front, navigating, and Fletcher would be alongside Korgan, feeding him energy food, monitoring his body temperature. “That’s how I was able to go all day,” Korgan said. “I get bad gas mileage. I need a lot of fuel.”

“I used affirmations to keep me moving forward,” Korgan said. “I began silently saying to myself, ‘I am strong, I am healthy, I am healed, and I am working toward my goal of reaching the South Pole.’ I eventually began to say these statements aloud and my teammates would often join me. Then, I said to myself daily, ‘Although my body has been broken in the past, my spirit never can be. I am unbreakable.’ “

On the final morning, a clearing in the clouds appeared and the sun poured like a beacon onto the South Pole, dedicated by a group of flags and pole marker.

On his feet

About 100 feet away, Korgan got off his sit-ski, wobbled a bit as Fletcher and Stoup each gave up one ski and pole and affixed them to the feet of their friend. Then with a small crowd watching nearby – more than 150 scientists from the South Pole’s Amundsen-Scott research station – Korgan made it to the end, on his own, on his two paralyzed feet, Stoup said.

Korgan cried as he hugged his best friends and said, “Thank you, guys.”

After a pause, he said, “I only wish my wife was here,” Stoup recounted.

From the small crowd, a figure in polar clothes walked out toward the men, then removed a mask: It was Shawna Korgan.

Korgan was stunned at the surprise, then embraced his wife. The magic of this moment overwhelmed all who shared it, Stoup said.

“I’ve witnessed the healing process over the last year,” Stoup said. “He is an inspiration to me and everybody who knows him. It is amazing to watch him.”

Korgan said he felt overwhelmed as he neared his goal.

“I was full of tears, to pass the flags, and the greatest moment in this recovery, and then, all of a sudden, there’s my wife,” Korgan said. “She said, ‘Welcome to the South Pole.’ “

Late last week, as he reviewed the scope of the expedition, Korgan said he and his wife shared a mantra throughout.

“I kept thinking, ‘The goal, the dream, the desire,’ ” Korgan said. “That’s what we say. I faced that over and over as we went. You have to decide what you want and then focus solely on what works.”

E-mail Tom Stienstra at tstienstra@sfchronicle.com.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/outdoors/article/Paralyzed-athlete-Grant-Korgan-achieves-polar-goal-2803082.php#ixzz2RyMqYOMS

19
Mar

Athlete Spotlight: Mattie Smallhouse

BigSmallhouseMattie Smallhouse had a great weekend up at Mammoth this past weekend. I wanted to share how well he did: Matt, had a good weekend at Mammoth –3rd on Saturday, and 8th on Sunday.  He ran 5th to last on Saturday when the course had slowed a bit (the kids race based on a random draw—there were 70 boys in his class).  The kids who beat him for the most part outweigh him by 30-50 lbs.

Here at EDU we are so stoked to see our athletes compete at a very high level and get the results they deserve. I can not be more excited for Mattie and all the hard work he has put into school, training on hill and not to mention, the time he puts in at EDU.

KEEP RIPPIN Mattie!

 

19
Mar

Will the FMS Cure Most Communicable Diseases?

Gray Cook

Posted February 15, 2011

Hey Mike

Many of the over simplifications have been addressed in the book. Unfortunately people talk more than they read and I can tell it is beginning to irritate you.

OK, so the title is a bit tongue-in-cheek. However, if you are a regular Strengthcoach.com reader you might be tempted to answer yes. It seems every thread now begins with the statement “have you done the FMS on them”. Every answer parrots the same mantra. If you attack the weak pattern, the athlete or client will be miraculously cured.

The weak pattern will drive performance problems, but performance problems can also be due to poor performance. That’s why I suggest that both be tested. 

To be honest, I think doing the FMS should be step one for every client that complains of pain. In fact, if you have the time it should be step one for every client, period.

I actually think the SFMA will get the painful problem managed more efficiently and effectively than the FMS. I advise the people with pain to skip the FMS. 

I am a huge fan of the FMS, of Gray Cook and of Lee Burton (the co-creator). However as Alwyn Cosgrove likes to say first we underreact, then we overreact. As one member said yesterday “has the pendulum possibly swung too far?”. The FMS is a screen. It is a way to begin to gather information about an athlete or a client relative to the way they move. For me it is step one when an athlete or client complains of pain. What it is not is a heat-seeking missile that will expose a weak pattern and present a miracle cure.

I just read a thread that intimated that FMS correctives will cure shin splints. That is what prompted me to write this article. Yes, the shin splints could be the result of a biomechanical fault that originates in the hips or the core but it is overuse that causes shin splints. In past years when I ran too much my shins hurt. If I followed a more progressive program they did not. Every overuse injury is not a movement fault.

Totally agreed — every overuse injury is not a movement fault — but don’t stop there — prove it! If the FMS shows serious dysfunction then you cannot rule out a movement problem. On the other hand if the FMS is clear or at least 2s on everything with no asymmetries then you have identified a performance problem, programming overload, or inappropriate activity choice.

 

Some people just aren’t the right body type for distance running. No amount of corrective work is going to make an offensive lineman into a distance runner. If you fix his Active Straight Leg Raise and then send him out for a 5 miler he will probably still have shin or low back issues.

This may be the way some misguided people use our model — but I’ve never implied anything like this — ever!

It is the old hammer analogy. My hand hurts when I hit it with the hammer. The Dr’s advice, hit the nail.

I love the fact that everyone has embraced the FMS and is beginning to see the value of screening, evaluating or assessing but please let’s not overstate it’s value so that people begin to discount it. The Functional Movement Screen is step one in the process. Step two is up to you. Step two does not have to be “refer them to an SFMA therapist”.

I’ve never said to send the FMS client or athlete with pain to a medical professional trained in the SFMA. It’s just nice when someone speaks the same language. All I’ve ever said is — don’t go it alone — get some help and limit your liability and protect your client / athlete in the most responsible way possible. 

There are thousands and thousands of excellent therapists who have no idea how to perform the FMS who will do an excellent job of getting someone better.

Agreed! No argument from me!

 

There are numerous models for therapy and rehab. Gray’s model best fits the Sahrmann model of rehab through movement. As strength coaches, athletic trainers and physical therapists, this model fits extremely well for us as it works within the confines of our abilities. However, I have seen the best results when the skills of manual therapy are combined with the model of rehab through movement. In my experience the “weak pattern” is very often a result of a soft tissue or joint dysfunction that simply will not get better by attacking the weak pattern. Often a qualified physical therapist must aggressively attack joint function or tissue quality.

Our fascination with the FMS reminds me of the old internet fascination with ART. Every internet thread started with “have you found an ART provider yet”. We need to remember that all methods are tools in a toolbox. Sometimes the best tool is the computer or the phone. Much like the TV show Who Wants to be a Millionaire, the best thing you can do is phone a friend to get the right answer.

Please be careful not to oversimplify complex processes. There are no right answers and as the old saying goes, there are many ways to skin a cat. If someone asks you “how do I skin a cat”. You are not required to answer “have you performed the FMS on the cat yet”.

Sorry the FMS — misunderstandings take time out of the other stuff you would like to do. Unfortunately we are both in education and it is our responsibility to answer the stuff directed at us. I hope that the people who have read my new book are not the ones misapplying the model. As a matter of fact every response I’ve provided is in the book.

I’ve also attached all the principles from chapter 15 in the book. All I really care about is the principles — the FMS and SFMA are just the methods I use to stay as close as possible to the principles. I also provided extra commentary in blue. Enjoy

Thanks for the heads-up!

One last thing brother — I think a quick way to clarify whether an FMS question is worth answering is to ask the individual who posted it if they have read the Movement Book. If they have not there is a good chance the answer is readily available. If someone posted about Shirley’s work you might first question if they had studied her work as much as you have.

PS- If you have the time the FMS should still be step one for every client, period. But remember it is a way to begin to gather information about an athlete or a client relative to the way they move. “

 

Principle # 1

We should separate painful movement patterns from dysfunctional movement patterns whenever possible to create clarity and perspective.

*What I want you to know — I feel the starting point is to separate pain and dysfunction and I have opinions about what to do next. I guess I’m not satisfied with the current systems I see in place. I’m not offended when people criticize the screen — I’m just disappointed when they don’t have a viable solution to put in it’s place.

Principle # 2

The starting point for movement learning is a reproducible movement baseline.

*What I want you to know — We set far more performance baselines than movement baselines. When we do set movement baselines they are often not standardized. Without standardization it is nearly impossible to develop a statistical injury prediction model.

Principle # 3

Biomechanical and physiological evaluation does not provide a complete risk screening or diagnostic assessment tool for comprehensive understanding of movement-pattern behaviors.

*What I want you to know — This does not imply that we stop looking at biomechanics and physiological factors. It just means that we need to add a whole movement profile into the equation. The # 1 risk factor for a future injury is a previous injury… Even if you have a good PT, even if you have a good trainer, even if you have a good coach… We don’t have bad pros we suffer from the lack of a manageable system.

Principle # 4

Movement learning and relearning has hierarchies’ fundamental to the development of perception and behavior.

*What I want you to know — A clear understanding of movement pattern capability reduces the trial and error we often experience when trying to gauge a client or athletes movement learning capabilities. It also offers a level of risk management that is supported by research.

Principle # 5

Corrective exercise should not be a rehearsal of outputs. Instead, it should represent challenging opportunities to manage mistakes on a functional level near the edge of ability.

*What I want you to know — There is more to corrective exercise than just doing exercises correctly.

Principle # 6

Perception drives movement behavior and movement behavior modulates perception.

*What I want you to know — When movement pattern dysfunction is identified the client or athlete is often unable to correct the problem with verbal instruction or isolation exercise.

Principle # 7

We should not put fitness on movement dysfunction.

*What I want you to know — Everyone seems to agree with this but no one seems to have a systematic solution. Basically every trainer I know says they have enough experience not to do this but no one has a reproducible system. Everyone just vouches for himself or herself. My question is — If everyone is doing so well why do we still have low back pain, non-contact athletic injuries and training related injuries.

Principle # 8

We must develop performance and skill considering each tier in the natural progression of movement development and specialization.

*What I want you to know — The FMS is not the only thing — but I feel it is the first thing. Frequency, intensity, volume, performance level, and all the other factors regarding appropriate activity and conditioning must still be considered. It is entirely possible to have a good FMS and still get shin splints from running. This scenario suggests that movement capability is present but performance considerations were not managed.

Principle # 9

Our corrective exercise dosage recipe suggests we work close to the baseline, at the edge of ability, with a clear goal. This should produce a rich sensory experience filled with manageable mistakes.

*What I want you to know — It is refreshing to explore exercises that require increased sensory awareness. I used to think 3 sets of 10 reps would fix stuff and then I started to measure things to see exactly what I had changed — not much.

Principle # 10

The routine practice of self-limiting exercises can maintain the quality of our movement perceptions and behaviors, and preserve our unique adaptability that modern conveniences erode.

*What I want you to know — Motor learning seems to progress at an accelerated rate with exercises that make us work and also pay attention. Self-limiting exercises require a certain level of technical skill before you could even come close to a volume that would place unnecessary risk. My lists of self-limiting exercises are simply suggestions to force precision with higher levels of sensory input.

22
Feb

EDU Female Skiers took ALL the medals in State

Its a good day at EDU for our Female Ski Athletes at the High School State Championships. Alex Benales, Claire DeAngeli and Megan Resigno all stole the show in Giant Slalom, Slalom and Overall.

Here is the breakdown:
Alex Benales: 1st Place in GS
Megan Resigno: 2nd Place in GS

Claire DeAngeli: 1st Place in Slalom
Megan Resigno: 2nd Place in GS

Megan Resigno: Overal Winner

claired

Alex Banales

Megan Resigno Mt. Rose Race Team

Megan Resigno Mt. Rose Race Team

SKIING: MANOGUE BOYS WIN TITLE FOR COACH

By Eric Lee Castillo sports@rgj.com

12:00 AM, Feb. 22, 2013 EST
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The Bishop Manogue boys ski team team won its first state championship in school history Thursday at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe, and it was in honor of Miners coach Scott Trabert.

The first-year coach, who said he has about 22 years of skiing experience, took a break from the ski world when his 20-year-old son Matt died on Aug. 9, 2010, in a car accident. Now, Trabert’s return to skiing has been memorable.

“You know Manogue hasn’t really been on the radar when it comes to skiing in this state, but Scott has really turned it around,” Reed coach Todd Tuttle said.

Trabert’s presence is added motivation for Miners sophomore Stephen Osborne as he performed at his peak, winning the slalom while wearing the skis Matt wore when he earned the same honor as a sophomore at Wooster in 2005.

“I actually didn’t have the right skis for the weekend, and he (Trabert) offered them, so I was really honored to use them since his son meant so much to him and was such a great skier,” Osborne said. “Even though Scott has only been our coach for one season, I’ve known him a long time and he’s always been there for me like another dad would.”

Osborne also grabbed a fifth-place finish in giant slalom and barely lost the overall individual title to Reno’s Matt Cooper, who finished second in slalom and first in giant slalom.

“It was an honor and a pleasure to have Stephen be able to ski on my son’s skis, win a slalom event this year …,” Trabert said. “I know my son’s sitting out there looking over us very proud.”

The Miners defeated second-place Wooster by a 131-95 margin. Reno finished in third place with a score of 148, and Reed fourth with 249.

The Manogue girls didn’t fare quite as well, finishing third with 166 points behind first-place Galena (95) and Wooster (112). Reno finished fourth at 201.

However, Miners junior Alex Banales stole the show during day two of the state meet with a first-place finish in giant slalom. Banales beat Galena’s No. 1 skier and the event’s overall individual champion, Megan Rescigno, by 1.2 seconds.

“It’s been a privilege to be a part of the team this season because Scott’s such a great coach,” Banales said. “He’s really taught us a lot, and this is the hardest we’ve worked and the best we’ve performed in all three years I’ve been on the ski team.”

20
Feb

EDU’s PT Transition Program on Fox11 Reno

Special thanks to Thomas Wood and Fox11 for helping with our vision and putting it into a visual voice.

Marc Digesti USAW | Founder and Director of Performance

17
Feb

Truckee Ski Racers medal after knee reconstruction surgeries

PerformancEDU so stoked to see the success of Perry post injury. Lots of GREATNESS to come.
Truckee Ski Racers medal after knee reconstruction surgeries
Dr. B Denmark
Special to the Sun
Morganne Murphy (center), Perry Schaffner (right) and Julia Bjorkman (left) stand on the podium at the Sugar Bowl Open alpine ski races last weekend. Both Murphy and Schaffner have successfully recovered from ACL injuries.

Morganne Murphy (center), Perry Schaffner (right) and Julia Bjorkman (left) stand on the podium at the Sugar Bowl Open alpine ski races last weekend. Both Murphy and Schaffner have successfully recovered from ACL injuries.
Courtesy Lawrence Denmark
 With the world’s attention focused on Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn’s horrific crash in Super G at the World Alpine Ski Championships this week, many wonder how she will make a comeback and return to competitive skiing.

The truth is that Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tears in female athletes are a widespread problem, and this injury happens frequently in competitive skiers. But thanks to advances in Orthopedic Surgery, the return to competitive sports is not only possible but a reality.

Truckee ski racers Morganne Murphy, 19, and Perry Schaffner, 16, are a testament to this fact.

Less than one year out from ACL reconstruction surgery, both athletes were atop the podium receiving medals at the Sugar Bowl Open alpine ski races last weekend. Murphy collected one gold and two silver medals in GS and slalom, while Schaffner won silver and bronze in slalom.

These racers attribute their return to competitive skiing to the surgical skills of U.S. Ski Team surgeon Terrence Orr MD, as well as intensive physical therapy and their own determination.

“In 2011 I was at the top of my game,” said Murphy, who was the 2011 J2 Combined Alpine National Champion and 2010 U.S. Junior Ski Cross Champion. “That all came tumbling down after my injury, but I feel like I’m better than ever now.”

In an effort to decrease knee injuries in alpine racers, the Federation of International Skiing (FIS) has mandated changes to competition ski design starting the 2013-2014 competitive season. Additional recommendations to minimize ACL injuries include strengthening the hamstring muscles, as well as physical conditioning with a focus on strength, flexibility and agility training.

Some racers wear protective braces to minimize the chance of injury, but even these do not ensure full protection. Murphy, who was wearing protective knee braces at the time of her injury, does feel that her brace protected her knee from more extensive damage, however.

Their performance at Sugar Bowl qualifies Murphy and Schaffner for the USSA Western Region Championships in Washington next month. Both hope to compete at the 2013 U.S. Alpine Championships at Squaw Valley, and are looking forward to a bright future in competitive skiing.

— Dr. B Denmark is chief of staff at Pershing General Hospital in Lovelock, Nev. 

8
Feb

Why are chopping and lifting movements important in EDU’s corrective program?

Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU

The chop and lift represent distinct rotational and diagonal movements that mimic the functional patterns occurring in activities of sport and daily living.  The chop and lift motions are excellent at recruiting the musculature of the core (foundation) either for mobility or stability.

The use of full kneeling and half kneeling postures during the chop and lift patterns add another dimension to the functional assessment and training.  After following the rolling patterns (which we will talk about in our next blog), full and half kneeling postures are the next developmental steps on our progressions to function.

The next and highest level is going to be standing or other functional postures which will offer to challenge our stability systems (neuromuscular, proprioception/coordination etc).  We call our full and half kneeling postures “transitions to stability.”  These postures will stress or recruit the smaller stabilizing muscles of the core and lower quarters.  The standing postures will offer a wide and adaptable base of support that will offer all of the lower quarters/half  extremity of the kinetic chain.

Here is a variation of full kneeling and half kneeling chopping and lifting movements. They can be administered either with thera bands, cook bands or Keiser equipment:

Full Kneeling lifting with chop bar Half Kneeling Chop with Chop Bar

5
Feb

What are the goals in a corrective program?

The most important goal of a corrective exercise program is to breakdown and focus on one dysfunctional movement pattern or weak link at a time.  When we prioritize which dysfunctional pattern to begin with, we always first consider the left to right asymmetries. If there is an imbalance between the right and left sides of the body, great focus will be placed on the area of the greatest limitation. This will be done to achieve balance and symmetry within the movement pattern.

At EDU we refer to 6 positions, with also assistance/resistance being used:

  • Non-weight bearing-no resistance with core pre activation
  • Quadruped-no resistance with core auto activation
  • Kneeling-Resistance with Core pre activated
  • Half Kneeling-Resistance with Core auto activated
  • Standing-Resistance with Core pre activated
  • Split Stance-Resistance with Core auto activated

All of the corrective movements will be prescribed post FMS screen and will also be plugged into the athletes or clients program.

Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU

30
Jan

Benefits of Cold and Hot Water HydroTherapy

Human Kinetics/ News and Exerpts: Hydrotherapy used to enhance recovery from competition

Despite the widespread integration of hydrotherapy into an athlete’s postexercise recovery regime, information regarding these interventions is largely anecdotal. Although a number of physiological responses to water immersion are well researched, the underlying mechanisms related to postexercise recovery are poorly understood. The human body responds to water immersion with changes in cardiac response, peripheral resistance, and blood flow (Wilcock et al. 2006). In addition, both hydrostatic pressure and temperature of the immersion medium may influence the success of different hydrotherapy interventions (Wilcock et al. 2006).

Immersion of the body in water can result in an inward and upward displacement of fluid from the extremities to the central cavity due to hydrostatic pressure. As identified by Wilcock and colleagues (2006), the resulting displacement of fluid may increase the translocation of substrates from the muscle. Therefore, postexercise edema may be lessened and muscle function maintained. Another physiological response to water immersion is an increase in stroke volume, which has been shown to increase cardiac output.

Although the effects of hydrostatic pressure exerted on the body during water immersion may be beneficial, the temperature of water that the body is exposed to is also thought to influence the success of such recovery interventions. The main physiological effect of immersion in cold water is a reduction in blood flow due to peripheral vasoconstriction (Meeusen and Lievens 1986). In contrast, immersion in hot water increases blood flow via peripheral vasodilation (Bonde-Petersen et al. 1992; Knight and Londeree 1980).

Cold Water Immersion

Cryotherapy (meaning “cold treatment,” often in the form of an ice pack) is the most commonly used treatment for acute soft tissue injuries, given its ability to reduce the inflammatory response and alleviate spasm and pain (Eston and Peters 1999; Meeusen and Lievens 1986; Merrick et al. 1999). Multiple physiological responses to various cooling methods have been observed, including a reduction in heart rate and cardiac output and an increase in arterial blood pressure and peripheral resistance (Sramek et al. 2000; Wilcock et al. 2006). Additional responses include a decrease in core and tissue temperature (Enwemeka et al. 2002; Lee et al. 1997; Merrick et al. 2003; Yanagisawa et al. 2007), acute inflammation (Yanagisawa et al. 2004), and pain (Bailey et al. 2007; Washington et al. 2000) and an improved maintenance of performance (Burke et al. 2000; Yeargin et al. 2006). Merrick and colleagues (1999) suggested that cryotherapy is an effective method for decreasing inflammation, blood flow, muscle spasm, and pain as well as skin, muscular, and intra-articular temperatures.

The use of cryotherapy for the treatment of muscle damage and exercise-induced fatigue has been investigated with varying findings. Eston and Peters (1999) investigated the effects of cold water immersion (of the exercised limb in 15 °C for 15 min) on the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage following strenuous eccentric exercise. The muscle-damaging exercise consisted of eight sets of five maximal isokinetic contractions (eccentric and concentric) of the elbow flexors of the dominant arm (0.58 rad · s–1and 60 s rest between sets). The measures used to assess the presence of exercise-induced muscle damage included plasma CK concentration, isometric strength of the elbow flexors, relaxed arm angle, local muscle tenderness, and upper arm circumference. Eston and Peters (1999) found CK activity to be lower and relaxed elbow angle to be greater for the cold water immersion group on days 2 and 3 following the eccentric exercise, concluding that the use of cold water immersion may reduce the degree to which the muscle and connective tissue unit becomes shortened after strenuous eccentric exercise (Eston and Peters 1999).

Bailey and colleagues (2007) investigated the influence of cold water immersion on indices of muscle damage. Cold water immersion (or passive recovery) was administered immediately following a 90 min intermittent shuttle run protocol; rating of perceived exertion (RPE), muscular performance (maximal voluntary contraction of the knee extensors and flexors), and blood variables were monitored prior to exercise, during recovery, and following recovery for 7 days. The authors concluded that cold water immersion was a highly beneficial recovery intervention, finding a reduction in muscle soreness, a reduced decrement of performance, and a reduction in serum myoglobin concentration 1 h following exercise (Bailey et al. 2007). However, further values across the 7-day collection period were not cited, and CK response was unchanged regardless of intervention. Lane and Wenger (2004) investigated the effects of active recovery, massage, and cold water immersion on repeated bouts of intermittent cycling separated by 24 h. Cold water immersion had a greater effect compared with passive recovery, active recovery, and massage on recovery between exercise bouts, resulting in enhanced subsequent performance (Lane and Wenger 2004). This is an important investigation, as most studies in the area of cold water immersion have been conducted using muscle damage models or recovery from injury. Despite these promising results, some studies have found negligible changes when investigating the recovery effects of cold water immersion (Paddon-Jones and Quigley 1997; Sellwood et al. 2007; Yamane et al. 2006).

In a randomized controlled trial, Sellwood and colleagues (2007) investigated the effect of ice-water immersion on delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Following a leg extension exercise task (5 ×10 sets at 120% concentric 1RM), participants performed either 3 × 1 min water exposure separated by 1 min in either 5 °C or 24 °C (control) water. Pain, swelling, muscle function (one-leg hop for distance), maximal isometric strength, and serum CK were recorded at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 h after damage. The only significant difference observed between the groups was lower pain in the sit-to-stand test at 24 h postexercise in the ice-water immersion group (Sellwood et al. 2007). In accordance with Yamane and colleagues (2006), only the exercised limb was immersed at a temperature of 5 °C. In this study, ice-water immersion was no more beneficial than tepid water immersion in the recovery from DOMS (Yamane et al. 2006). Paddon-Jones and Quigley (1997) induced damage in both arms (64 eccentric elbow flexion), and then one arm was immersed in 5 °C water for 5 × 20 min, with 60 min between immersions, while the other served as a control. No differences were observed between arms during the next 6 days for isometric and isokinetic torque, soreness, and limb volume (Paddon-Jones and Quigley 1997). In the aforementioned studies, cold water immersion appeared to be an ineffective treatment, specifically when immersing an isolated limb in 5 °C water.

Only one study has investigated the effect of cold water immersion on training adaptation. Yamane and colleagues (2006) investigated the influence of regular postexercise cold water immersion following cycling or handgrip exercise. Exercise tasks were completed 3 to 4 times per week for 4 to 6 weeks, with cooling protocols consisting of limb immersion in 5 °C (leg) or 10 °C (arm) water. The control group showed a significant training effect in comparison to the treatment group, and the authors concluded that cooling was ineffective in inducing molecular and humoral adjustments associated with specified training effects (e.g., muscle hypertrophy, increased blood supply, and myofibril regeneration).

Despite these findings, the majority of research supports the notion that cold water immersion is effective in reducing symptoms associated with DOMS (Eston and Peters 1999), repetitive high-intensity exercise (Bailey et al. 2007; Lane and Wenger 2004), and muscle injury (Brukner and Khan 1993). A more refined investigation into the individual components of a specific recovery protocol is needed to reveal the effect of varying the duration of exposure, the temperature, and the medium used, whether it is ice, air, or water. In addition, training studies are required to investigate the effectiveness of such interventions on training adaptations.

Hot Water Immersion

The use of heat as a recovery tool has been recommended to increase the working capacity of athletes (Viitasalo et al. 1995) and assist in the rehabilitation of soft tissue injuries and athletic recovery (Brukner and Khan 1993; Cornelius et al. 1992). The majority of hot water immersion protocols are performed in water warmer than 37 °C, resulting in an increase in muscle and core body temperature (Bonde-Petersen et al. 1992; Weston et al. 1987). The physiological effects of immersion in hot water remain to be elucidated. One of the main physiological responses associated with exposure to heat is increased peripheral vasodilation, resulting in increased blood flow (Bonde-Petersen et al. 1992; Wilcock et al. 2006).

The effect of hot water immersion on subsequent performance is also poorly understood. Only one study has investigated the effect of hot water immersion on postexercise recovery. Viitasalo and colleagues (1995) incorporated three 20 min warm (~37 °C) underwater water-jet massages into the training week of 14 junior track-and-field athletes. The results indicated an enhanced maintenance of performance (assessed via plyometric drop jumps and repeated bounding) following the water treatment, indicating a possible reduction in DOMS. However, significantly higher CK and myoglobin concentrations were observed following the water treatment, suggesting either greater damage to the muscle cells or an increased leakage of proteins from the muscle into the blood. Viitasalo and colleagues (1995) concluded that combining underwater water-jet massage with intense strength training increases the release of proteins from the muscle into the blood, while enhancing the maintenance of neuromuscular performance (Viitasalo et al. 1995).

Evidence to support these findings is lacking, and the use of hot water immersion for recovery has received minimal research attention. Despite the hypothesized benefits of this intervention, anecdotal evidence suggests that hot water immersion is not widely prescribed on its own or as a substitute for other recovery interventions. Speculation surrounds the possible effects, timing of recovery, and optimal intervention category (e.g., following which type or intensity of exercise) for the use of hot water immersion.

Contrast Water Therapy

During contrast water therapy, athletes alternate between heat exposure and cold exposure by immersion in warm and cold water, respectively. This therapy has frequently been used as a recovery intervention in sports medicine (Higgins and Kaminski 1998) and is commonly used within the sporting community. Although research investigating contrast water therapy as a recovery intervention for muscle soreness and exercise-induced fatigue is limited in comparison to that for cold water immersion, several researchers have proposed possible mechanisms that may support the use of contrast water therapy. Higgins and Kaminski (1998) suggested that contrast water therapy can reduce edema through a pumping action created by alternating peripheral vasoconstriction and vasodilation. Contrast water therapy may bring about other changes such as increased or decreased tissue temperature, increased or decreased blood flow, changes in blood flow distribution, reduced muscle spasm, hyperemia of superficial blood vessels, reduced inflammation, and improved range of motion (Myrer et al. 1994). Active recovery has traditionally been considered superior to passive recovery. Contrast water therapy may elicit many of the same benefits of active recovery and may prove to be more beneficial, given that contrast water therapy imposes fewer energy demands on the athlete (Wilcock et al. 2006).

Contrast water therapy has been found to effectively decrease postexercise lactate levels (Coffey et al. 2004; Hamlin 2007; Morton 2006; Sanders 1996). After conducting a series of Wingate tests, investigators found that blood lactate concentrations recovered at similar rates when using either contrast water therapy or active recovery protocols and that after passive rest blood lactate removal was significantly slower (Sanders 1996). Coffey and colleagues (2004) investigated the effects of three different recovery interventions (active, passive, and contrast water therapy) on 4 h repeated treadmill running performance. Contrast water therapy and active recovery reduced blood lactate concentration by similar amounts after high-intensity running. In addition, contrast water therapy was associated with a perception of increased recovery. However, performance during the high-intensity treadmill running task returned to baseline levels 4 h after the initial exercise task regardless of the recovery intervention performed.

In a more recent study investigating the effect of contrast water therapy on the symptoms of DOMS and the recovery of explosive athletic performance, recreational athletes completed a muscle-damaging protocol on two separate occasions in a randomized crossover design (Vaile et al. 2008a). The two exercise sessions differed only in recovery intervention (contrast water therapy or passive recovery/control). Following contrast water therapy, isometric force production was not significantly reduced below baseline levels throughout the 72 h data collection period; however, following passive recovery, peak strength was significantly reduced from baseline by 14.8% ± 11.4% (Vaile et al. 2008a). Strength was also restored more rapidly within the contrast water therapy group. Thigh volume measured immediately following contrast water therapy was significantly less than that following passive recovery, indicating lower levels of tissue edema. These results indicate that symptoms of DOMS and restoration of strength are improved following contrast water therapy compared with passive recovery (Vaile et al. 2007; Vaile et al. 2008a). However, Hamlin (2007) found contrast water therapy to have no beneficial effect on performance during repeated sprinting. Twenty rugby players performed two repeated sprint tests separated by 1 h; between trials subjects completed either contrast water therapy or active recovery. Although substantial decreases in blood lactate concentration and heart rate were observed following contrast water therapy, compared with the first exercise bout, performance in the second exercise bout was decreased regardless of intervention (Hamlin 2007). Therefore, although contrast water therapy appears to be beneficial in the treatment of DOMS, it may not hasten the recovery of performance following high-intensity repeated sprint exercise.

The physiological mechanisms underlying the reputed benefits remain unclear. Temperatures for contrast water therapy generally range from 10 to 15 °C for cold water and 35 to 38 °C for warm water. It is evident that contrast water therapy is being widely used; however, additional research needs to be conducted to clarify its optimal role and relative efficacy.

Pool Recovery

Pool or beach recovery sessions are commonly used by team sport athletes in an attempt to enhance recovery from competition. Almost all Australian Rules, Australian Rugby League, and Australian Rugby Union teams use pool recovery sessions to perform active recovery in a non–weight-bearing environment. These sessions are typically used to reduce muscle soreness and stiffness and therefore are thought to be effective in sports that involve eccentric muscle damage or contact. Sessions often include walking and stretching in the pool and occasionally some swimming.

Dawson and colleagues (2005) investigated the effect of pool walking as a recovery intervention immediately following a game of Australian Rules Football. Pool walking was compared with contrast water therapy, stretching, and passive recovery (control) to determine the effect on subjective ratings of muscle soreness, flexibility (sit and reach test), and power (6 s cycling sprint and vertical jumps) assessed 15 h after the game. For all four recovery interventions, muscle soreness was increased 15 h after the game; however, only pool walking resulted in a significant reduction in subjective soreness. There was a trend for lower flexibility and power scores; however, this was only significant in the control trial. Although there were no differences between the three recovery interventions with respect to flexibility and power, players subjectively rated pool walking as the most effective and preferable strategy. The authors speculated that the active, light-intensity exercise with minimal impact stress or load bearing, combined with the hydrostatic pressure, may have enhanced recovery (Dawson et al. 2005).

Read more from Physiological Tests for Elite Athletes, Second Edition, by Australian Institute of Sport, Rebecca Tanner and Christopher Gore.

26
Jan

One tool EDU uses for POWER

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EDU has built a very good relationship with Keiser through Jay Keiser and Athletic Systems. The past 1.3 years, EDU has been able to aquire 5 Keiser pieces:

  • Performance Trainer
  • Keiser Air Squat
  • 2 Keiser m3 bikes
  • 1 Keiser m3+ bike

With Keiser, we are able to dive into Air Resistance rather than just using barbells and iron.

You can find the full article on Keiser’s website, but here is a little back ground of what EDU uses on a daily basis:

Keiser was invented to provide high resistance with very little inertia (moving mass), and without the dependence upon gravity. The elimination of a weight stack reduces the mass; therefore the force due to acceleration is virtually eliminated, which leaves only pure variable resistant force. The reduction of the acceleration forces and the elimination of dependence on gravity allow the variable resistance strength curve to remain consistent over a wide range of training speeds. Read  the full research study and judge for yourself.

Keiser Air Resistance Advantages over Weight Stack Provided Resistance

- No shock loading to connective tissues and joints.
- The ability to change resistance at any time w/ fingertip controls.
- A consistent variable resistance curve at any speed.
- Offers privacy of workload.
- Resistance changeable at 1/10 pound increments on Infinity Series
- Large Digital display/Counts repetitions.
- Equipment of choice in over 70 peer-reviewed research studies on training.

22
Jan

Plyometrics breakdown and POWER Q&A

got-power

What are Plyometrics?

  • Plyometrics are drills aimed at linking sheer strength and speed of movement to produce an explosive-reactive type of movement.
  • Classically used to describe jumping/depth jumping drills
  • Definition expanded to include ANY drill utilizing stretch-shorten cycle to produce explosive reaction:
    • Jumping
    • Medicine Ball
    • Resistance Training
    • ALL MOVEMENT!

What are the Benefits of Power Training?

  • Rate of force development
  • Elasticity
  • Dynamic stabilization
  • Movement skills

What are the Concerns of Power Training?

  • Tissue loading
  • High force traveling through compensatory motion

How Can We Train for Speed while emphasizing Power?

  • Assisted Drills
  • Resisted Drills
  • Linear and Multi-directional Movements

What types of Methods can we use to train for Power?

  • Tempos
  • Olympics
  • Contrasts
  • Complex
  • Bands
  • Chains

Marc Digesti USAW | Director of Performance at PerformancEDU of Reno

 

8
Jan

EDU Female Skiers turned it up at Squaw for GS Race

Perry Schaffner J2

Perry Schaffner J2

Not a bad day for EDU athletes Lena Andrews, Perry Schaffner and Claire Deangeli.

Lena Andrews US Alpine D Team

Lena Andrews US Alpine D Team

Claire DeAngeli Far West

Claire DeAngeli Far West

Rank Bib FIS Code Name Year Nation Run 1 Run 2 Total Time FIS Points
 1  8  539898 ANDREWS Lena  1994  USA   1:10.76  1:07.10  2:17.86  50.82
 2  15  539890 KELLEY Naomi  1994  USA   1:11.07  1:08.22  2:19.29  60.05
 3  18  6535324 TIDD Jessica  1995  USA   1:11.88  1:08.28  2:20.16  65.67
 4  3  6535254 JOHNSON Madeline  1995  USA   1:14.19  1:06.55  2:20.74  69.41
 5  13  6535456 JOHNSON Hannah  1996  USA   1:12.84  1:09.79  2:22.63  81.61
 6  7  6535448 HAGEN Danica  1996 USA  1:13.36  1:09.71  2:23.07  84.45
 7  21  6535629 SCHAFFNER Perry  1996  USA   1:14.26  1:09.99  2:24.25  92.07
 8  9  539920 GOWEN Morgan  1994  USA   1:13.72  1:11.43  2:25.15  97.88
 9  19  45332 KELLY Charlee  1995  AUS   1:15.80  1:09.90  2:25.70  101.43
 10  10  6535493 SCHADLICH Daisy  1996  USA   1:15.36  1:10.38  2:25.74  101.69
 11  2  6535605 POKORNY Bozhie  1996  USA   1:14.78  1:10.99  2:25.77  101.89
 12  12  6535306 RYAN Elizabeth  1995  USA   1:15.36  1:10.73  2:26.09  103.95
 13  4  6535435 DUNN Lauren  1996  USA   1:15.97  1:10.19  2:26.16  104.40
 14  16  6535179 ELICEGUI Taylor  1995 USA  1:15.67  1:11.60  2:27.27  111.57
 15  5  6535172 DEANGELI Claire  1995  USA   1:15.55  1:12.36  2:27.91  115.70
 16  17  6535417 ALVAREZ Alexandra  1996  USA   1:17.78  1:14.64  2:32.42  144.82
 17  23  6535422 BERG Annika  1996  USA   1:18.80  1:13.70  2:32.50  145.33
 18  24  6535384 THOMPSON Stephanie  1995  USA   1:18.65  1:14.53  2:33.18  149.72
 19  25  6535387 GANT Alicia  1995  USA   1:18.78  1:14.73  2:33.51  151.85
 20  29  6535588 HARRIS Lyndsay  1996  USA   1:19.57  1:14.80  2:34.37  157.41
 21  31  6535684 SCHREDER Rose  1996  USA   1:20.56  1:14.55  2:35.11  162.18
 22  28  6535720 SEARS Katie  1996  USA   1:20.14  1:16.18  2:36.32  169.99
 23  30  6535686 TERRILL Debra  1995  USA   1:20.53  1:16.89  2:37.42  177.10
 24  27  6535660 MARSHALL Anna  1996  USA   1:24.60  1:22.40  2:47.00  238.94
Did not start 1st run
   11  6535427 CASHELL Julia  1996  USA         
Did not finish 2nd run
   26  6535154 BANALES Alexandra  1995  USA         
   6  6535491 RYDER Sierra  1996  USA         
Did not finish 1st run
   20  6535243 WEHSENER Alexa  1995  USA         
   14  6535635 RIFFEL Natalie  1996  USA         
   1  6535477 NORTON Nikita  1996  USA         
7
Jan

Lower Body Corrective Movements at EDU

Two movement patterns we emphasize in our corrective movement library. Lateral plank with Hip flexion and Lateral Plank with hip abduction are modified and progressed a bit to help with shoulder, torso and hip stability.

 

 

7
Jan

PerformancEDU’s Facility in 2013….#traininghouse

EDU's Plyo's/Keiser PT and Ski ERG Area

EDU’s Plyo’s/Keiser PT and Ski ERG Area

EDU's Movement and TRX area

EDU’s Movement and TRX area

EDU's Waiting Area

EDU’s Waiting Area

EDU's MedBall Wall, Metabolic and Air Squat Area

EDU’s MedBall Wall, Metabolic and Air Squat Area

EDU's Platform for Olympic and Strength Training

EDU’s Platform for Olympic and Strength Training

3
Jan

PT Transition Program: Success Story

Cliff where injury occured

Cliff where injury occured

Kim Mann in Hospital post accident

Kim Mann in Hospital post accident

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Skiing is pretty much my life. I teach in South America in the summer time,” explains Kimberly Mann who travels the world with her skis in tow. On the search for the perfect run, she has canvassed terrain many wouldn’t dare. Last year, however, a challenging run proved to be disastrous for the expert skier. “It was an awesome pow-pow day and I was skiing with some friends – pushing the limits.” The epic conditions tempted Kimberly to take a turn she would never forget. “I couldn’t stop in time and I went over the cliff and fell rag doll-style 30 some odd feet through rocks.” She knew she wasn’t paralyzed, but she knew something was terribly wrong.

Ski patrol rushed Kimberly off the mountain and emergency crews took her to a hospital in Santiago, where she stayed for days. Doctors remarked that she was lucky to survive and were shocked she had such few injuries. “A compression fracture in my T8 and broken scapula, puncture wound to my left knee, torn capsule in my right knee, and a laceration on my forehead.”

Since the fall, Kimberly has been working to get back into skiing shape. She went straight to someone with plenty of experience training athletes on the slopes. Marc Digesti, who owns PerformanceEDU on South Virginia in Reno, worked as the Head Strength Coach for the U.S. Disabled Ski Team. “It was a great experience for me. I was able to travel about 150 days out of the year, working with some pretty incredible athletes with different disabilities.” He brought his experience with high level athletes on the slopes back home to the dry land in Reno, where he works with physical therapists and chiropractors to help people, like Kimberly, transition back to the sports they love.

Marc developed post-rehabilitation workouts, as well as a special strength training program that guide athletes through proper movement patterns, joint integrity and stability exercises. The program runs between four and six weeks. The goal? Marc says it is to get athletes healthy and back on the training field.

It is often a trying and emotional journey. Marc remembers the day when Kimberly walked through his door and wasn’t able to do some of the basic movements she has re-mastered over the last few months. She has made a remarkable recovery and has even hit the slopes again. Her next goal is to make the Pro Ski Instructors of America National Alpine Ski Team.

To learn more about Marc’s training program at PerformanceEDU, log on to http://www.performancedu.com.

6459 S Virginia St
Reno, NV 89511
(775) 354-8959
 
Written by Kristen Remington

Kim Mann post injury working on assisted knee hugs

Kim Mann post injury working on assisted knee hugs
Kim Mann Slayin it after PT Transition Program

Kim Mann Slayin it after PT Transition Program

 

 

3
Jan

What is PerformancEDU’s PT Transition Program?

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Director of Performance Marc Digesti

Director of Performance Marc Digesti

Mission Statement: PerformancEDU’s training philosophy is to examine the human body through movement and implement ways to decrease injury and increase performance. PerformancEDU evaluates the body while relating to functional movement, understands the bodies directional movement patterns, and prescribe and implement specific movements and progressions to maximize athletic performance in sport and life.

PerformancEDU remains true to the education placed on performance during each session.  PerformancEDU will provide you with the tools you need to perform at the highest level in life or on the field.  PerformancEDU is dedicated to helping others by:

  1. Improving performance
  2. Decreasing injury potential
  3. Motivating through education


The PT Transition Model would include a 4-6 week transition program post clearance from the PT which include:

  • Objective Numbers
    • Collaboration between PT and PerformancEDU through weekly reports
    • Functional Movement Screen
      • Performance Evaluation based on movement quality
      • Quality of movement patterns (mechanics)
    • Body Composition
      • Body Fat Testing through 7 site caliper pinch
      • Documentation of weight
    • Goals
    • Findings will determine the optimal training strategy for each client
  • Progressions
    • Activity will be broken down into Phases 1,2,3  (wk 1-4):
      • Glute Activation
      • Movement Prep
      • Pillar Strength
      • Elasticity
      • Strength
      • Energy System Development
  • Attention to Detail
    • Instruction
      • Verbal-Description
      • Visual-Demonstration
    • Analyzing
      • Observation
        • Front
        • Back
        • Side
        • Scanning
      • Questioning
        • Evaluate patients understanding
        • Engage the patient
    • Intervention
      • Cueing the patient
        • Verbal
        • Visual
        • Tactile
      • Modification of the movement
        • Quality over Quantity
        • Determining the most effective modifications

What are we going to prepare the client with?

  • Improve Performance
    • Lifestyle Enhancement
  • Decrease Injury Potential
    • Lifestyle Enhancement
  • Motivate through Education
    • Creating success
  • Work to Success
    • Attaining Goals

For more information regarding EDU’s PT Transition Program, email us at info@performancedu.com.

2
Jan

Someone to Know: Marc Digesti of PerformancEDU on News 2 Reno

Kim Mann interviewed by News 2

Kim Mann interviewed by News 2

 

Kim Mann Slayin it!

Kim Mann Slayin it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What a great way to start off the new year at EDU with such an amazing success story pushed out of PerformancEDU. Check out Kim Mann’s road back to coaching and skiing after a pretty horrifying fall off of 30+ ft cliff in Chile. Kim’s hard work, accountability, trust in the system and resilience have put her back at a high level of skiing. STOKED!  Check out the segment here from Kristen Remington’s Someone to know on News 2 Reno.

 

 

 

 

 

19
Dec

Massage DEAL of the month at EDU.

230289_473325082718654_456426605_nPerformancEDU is welcoming in the New Year with a package made for our clients and athletes in their recovery from training and life. For the month of January, EDU will be rolling out “Its all about YOU”  massage package. Here are the details and if you have any questions, please email us at info@performancedu.com:

  • 4 massage therapy sessions for 60 minutes
  • Package Cost: $100
  • Cost per massage: $25 (compared to $60)
  • Each massage will be administered 1 time per week for the month of January
  • The 4 massages have to be used in the month of January

Get to know your Massage Therapist:

Ralph Rodriguez LMT graduated from McQueen High school in 2002 and from Milan Institute as a massage therapist in 2012. In high school, he thrived as an amazing athlete, which allowed him to realize his interest in the mechanics of the human body and how to maintain/improve it. After researching and experiencing bodywork, he began to see the powerful, and crucial, effects that human touch has, therefore directing his focus to massage therapy.   In addition to massage therapy, Ralph takes pleasure in establishing and building customer and community relationships. He believes in the benefits of branching out into the community and gets to do this in his professional life at PerformancEDU. He believes with the proper knowledge, and the right touch, he can help people feel more balanced.

Ralph’s professional experience in Massage Therapy/Personal training field includes:

  • Manual Lymphatic Drainage
  • Passive Joint Mobilization
  • Kinesiology
  • Chair Massage
  • Reflexology
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Deep Tissue
  • Swedish Massage
  • Shiatsu
  • Trigger Point Therapy
  • Sports Massage
  • Acupressure
  • Prenatal
18
Dec

Group Training at EDU is adding classes

Want to start and finish your day feeling AMAZING? The Sunrise and Sunset Total Body group training is structured to take the place of a full body strength workout in a 60 minute time frame. These group sessions are set up in sets of exercises, with specific repetitions based off of timing system.  You will be using weights, med-balls, TRX’s, RIP Trainers, Keiser pneumatic Equipment, Platforms, Squat Racks and body weight, which will challenge you through the session. Everyone can go at their own pace, but the energy of the group and coaches will push you a bit further.  Total Body group sessions run daily Monday through Saturday. Sign up today for a class which fits your time frame!

 2013 NEW Group Training Packages at EDU:

Unlimited Training Sunrise Session 6am-7am (Monday-Friday ) Package:

Drop in Rate: $25

Month to Month Rate(unlimited sessions): $200

6 month commitment rate(unlimited sessions): $160 per month with Auto Deduction each month

Tuesday/Thursday Sunrise Session 7am-8am Package:

Drop in Rate (1 session): $25

Month to Month Rate (8 sessions): $130

3 month commitment rate (24 sessions): $100 per month with Auto Deduction each month

 Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday Sunrise Session Package:

Drop in Rate (1 session): $25

Month to Month Rate(12 sessions): $195

3 month commitment rate (36 sessions): $150 per month with Auto Deduction each month

 Saturday Sunrise Training 8am-9:15am Package:

Drop in Rate (1 session): $25

Month to Month (4 sessions): $80

3 month commitment rate (4 sessions): $50per month with Auto Deduction each month

 Monday/Wednesday Sunset Training 7pm-8pm Package:

Drop in Rate (1 session): $25

Month to Month Rate (8 sessions): $130

3 month commitment rate (24 sessions): $100 per month with Auto Deduction each month

 The “BOOM” Package:

Unlimited Training for any class at EDU

Month to Month Rate(unlimited sessions): $250

3 month commitment rate (unlimited sessions): $200 per month with Auto Deduction each month

 

6459 South Virginia St.  | Reno, Nevada 89511 | 775.354.8959

http://www.performancedu.com

info@performancedu.com

11
Dec

Macho culture at forefront of concussion issue

Great article about EDU’s client Johnno Lazatich.

Sean Keeler ARCHIVE | EMAIL
Sean Keeler is an award-winning columnist who joined FOX in 2012 after stints with The Des Moines Register, The Cincinnati Post, The Nashville Banner, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, The Arizona Republic, The San Francisco Examiner and The Topeka Capital-Journal.
May 23, 2012
JohnnoLazetich.jpgFormer K-State player Johnno Lazetich, pictured with his wife Jamie at Pyramid Lake, NV, says his short-term memory still comes and goes.

Spring college football

POWER STRUGGLE

LSU? Oregon? Texas? Which teamemerges from spring as No. 1?

Author Malcolm Gladwell recently suggested that college football be abolished or that its players be paid for their risk.

“It’s a bit much,” he told Slate.com, “both to maim AND exploit college football players.”

Fair points, all, even if the suits at the NCAA would probably laugh you straight out of Indianapolis. Money talks, even if Larry Linebacker can’t walk.

Besides, Johnno Lazetich has a better idea.

“It’s beautiful that the NFL alumni association are lobbying as hard as they are,” explains Lazetich, who played fullback at Kansas State in 1999-2000, during the apex of the first Bill Snyder Era. “There needs to be something at the college level for all of us who blew out their knees, blew out our shoulders, in addition to concussions. There needs to be help for us.”

Lazetich is 34 now. An old 34. He suffered seven concussions playing football in his teens and 20s, including five — by his count — during a two-year stretch at Manhattan. The doozy, he says, came against Temple in the 1999 season opener.

“My first memory of the day was coach Snyder coming to see me in intensive care,” Johnno recalls. “I don’t remember tying my tie. I don’t remember the game at all. And then (three) weeks later, I’m back starting again — it’s a (nationally televised) game with Brent Musburger announcing at Texas Stadium, just because I passed the concussion test at the time.

“We do a lot of stupid things. Looking back on it, it probably wasn’t the smartest thing I did.”

More than a decade later, the scars throb — and linger. Lazetich suffers lapses in concentration. The short-term memory comes and goes. The headaches are killer, although they pop up a lot less frequently than they did five years ago.

“Still, if you ask me to close my eyes and shake my head back and forth as hard as I can, I’d tell you to go (expletive) yourself,” says the native of Reno, Nev., who played at Oregon State before joining the Wildcats. “There are certain things that I’m really cautious (about). I definitely can’t afford any more concussions. I wear a helmet constantly. So I’ve lucked out as far as the fact that I don’t have as severe of (symptoms) of (post-concussion syndrome).”

Luck is relative, mind you: Lazetich estimates his injuries have cost him at least $500 per year, “Just for physical therapy, just for sports medicine, just for little things.”

None of this is an excuse to rail against football in general, or Kansas State in particular. To the contrary: Johnno has no beefs with Bill Snyder.

“Coach Snyder, he’s No. 1 as far making sure that his players are OK and safe,” Lazetich says. He has no problems with the trainers and staffers in the athletic department, either. He says they were looking out for his best interests first, and that he was the one pushing to re-enter the fray.

In hindsight, the only one Johnno blames is himself. Lazetich is a Tough Guy. Tough Guys don’t break the Macho Code. They get off their tails and get back in there. It’s not that Tough Guys aren’t told about the risks. It’s that Tough Guys don’t care.

“When I woke up in intensive care and didn’t remember the whole entire day, that probably should have been my last day,” chuckles Lazetich, who finally gave up football late in the 2000 campaign after taking a knee to the head against Oklahoma. “But it’s tough. Heck, you’re playing in front of soldout crowds, 50,000 to 60,000 people. We were ranked (second in the nation) going into the Oklahoma game. Here I am, the starting fullback.”

In March, the NCAA announced it was providing a $400,000 grant to the National Sport Concussion Outcomes Study Consortium to examine the effects of head injuries in all sports and both genders “through the course of a college career.” Of course, they could have saved that dough and just called Dr. Bart Grelinger first.

“Each time you get a concussion, it’s easier to get the next one,” says Grelinger, a Wichita neurologist and chair of the Kansas Sports Concussion Partnership. “Our heads just aren’t designed (for us) to be shaken like that.

“We have 100 billion brain cells we start with … I think football just gives you an opportunity to lose them quicker, because you get right back in harm’s way very quickly.”

Don’t get him wrong; Grelinger loves the sport. He even played it back in the day. He still participates in taekwondo. He’s a Tough Guy, too. He insists education is the key to prevention, as opposed to more equipment or — as you’ve seen in the headlines lately — litigation.

“Helmets will never keep up. Helmets will never answer it,” Grelinger says. “They can’t keep up (with) the pressure wave … It helps absorb some of the impact, but (the head is) still going to jerk.

“The bottom line is, I don’t think we were designed for this activity. We’re a gladiator society, what can I tell you? If it’s not football, it’s boxing, or MMA. We love competition, but there’s competition at a marathon. We REALLY like that gladiator kind of competition.”

With the non-believers, Grelinger likes to use this example: If you were playing volleyball in the backyard or on the beach, would you use your laptop or tablet to strike the thing? So why do you think it’s OK to use your head?

When it comes to reforming the Macho Culture, Grelinger says parents, not coaches or administrators, are our biggest obstacle.

“Everybody wants their boys to play. ‘He’s tough as nails, he’ll shake it off.’ That stuff doesn’t fly. You can’t think of your kids as gladiators.”

Pete Lazetich thinks of his kid as a blessing. Johnno, who helps manage his parents’ legal courier service and processing company back home in Reno, Nev., was a third-generation football standout, the latest branch in a family tree of Tough Guys. His dad, Pete, was an All-American at Stanford and played five years in the NFL with San Diego and Philadelphia. His grandfather, Bill, played with the old Cleveland Rams before joining the Marines during World War II. Great uncle Mike was a two-way star with the Rams between 1945-50.

Pete says he got his bell rung six or seven times, with roughly half of those coming during his NFL days — after one shot, he blacked out and woke up in the locker room only to find Deacon Jones there trying to hold him down. As a player, he feared no man. But as a parent of a prep fullback/linebacker, Pete feared every snap of every game Johnno ever played in.

“It’s terrifying, absolutely terrifying,” the elder Lazetich says. “And you watch the game, and you say a prayer before every play, just to keep them safe and sound.”

He also remembers the first time Johnno was diagnosed with a concussion, back in high school. When Pete got to the sidelines to try and talk to his son, he found Johnno sitting there, eyes awash with tears.

“You’re just disoriented, you’re frightened, you don’t know what’s going on,” Pete says. “I cried a couple times because you don’t know what the (expletive) is happening.”

An estimated 1.7 million people suffer traumatic brain injuries each year, according to the US Centers for Disease and Prevention. As they age, former professional football players are showing symptoms of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurological disorder that can lead to depression, memory loss and possibly dementia.

More than 2,000 pros are now suing the NFL, and the suicides of former defensive icons such as Junior Seau, Dave Duerson and Ray Easterling  — like Pete, a member of the NFL’s 1972 Draft class — has put the link between football and brain damage back on the front page.

“I really get a kick out of this now; now the NFL says, ‘Oh, man, we gotta study this,’” Pete says. “They’ve been hiding this for years. They didn’t want to go there for years and years. They just did an outstanding job of throwing this through smoke and mirrors and (expletive).

“I played with John Mackey his last year as a pro (in San Diego). He came out with John Unitas. There was something about the guy, being in the locker room, just listening to him speak, being as articulate as he was. Just a man. Just a leader. I’d vote for him for President. And (to see him) now — I couldn’t believe it.”

Last fall, a group of former college athletes — including three former football players — filed a lawsuit against the NCAA, asserting that the organization failed to establish concussion-screening guidelines and return-to-play policies. The suit seeks money to pay for medical bills and financial losses. But an NCAA spokesman told FOXSports.com this week he “wasn’t aware” of any discussions taking place as far as offering extended protection or insurance for former student-athletes. More’s the pity.

“It’s so tough to look back, because the experience was definitely — I mean, in certain ways, some of the best years (of my life),” Johnno says. “Your experience playing against Nebraska and Texas and Texas A&M, the Holiday Bowl, the Cotton Bowl, those kind of things. These are the things that you’re going to be able to tell your grandchildren.”

But what if your son gets the itch? What would you tell him? What if he comes running up to you one day and asks you to sign a consent form? After all, it runs in the blood.

Suddenly, Johnno is quiet. For a few seconds, he ponders.

“I’m definitely not going to tell him ‘no,’” Lazetich finally replies. “But he’s definitely going to know what daddy’s past was.”

Tough Guys don’t worry about regrets. Regrets are for old men. But isn’t it scary how many football players seem to get so old, so soon?

You can follow Sean Keeler on Twitter @seankeeler or email him at seanmkeeler@gmail.com

29
Oct

TRX: 6 THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE TRYING A CLASS

I came across this article for some who don’t know what TRX suspension training involves and how you can implement into a class setting.

EJNOY!

TRX: 6 THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE TRYING A CLASS

Updated Oct 11 2012 – 3:10am · Posted Oct 11 2012 – 3:08am by  · 2 Comments

TRX is a full-body strength workout that utilizes a person’s own body weight instead of relying on machines or dumbbells. Taylor Polli, a personal trainer and TRX instructor at Crunch gym, compares the workout to a simple version of Reformer Pilates or anti-gravity yoga. “Although this is whole-body suspension training, you use your core for all 45 minutes of the class.” While TRX classes seem to lean heavier on the male side, it’s just as female friendly — especially for the work it does on your abs. If you’ve always wondered what a class is like, here are a few things to keep in mind before giving it a shot.

  • Individual or group: TRX sessions are available individually or as group classes, either at a gym or in a private training facility. Make sure you ask before jumping into the mix, as some facilities prefer to train beginners together for their first class.
  • Movement on a plane: For the duration of this class your body will be suspended while moving forward, backward, or side to side. This class is made effective by its repetition of movement to tone the adjoining muscles.
  • Freedom: The TRX bands give you the freedom of mobility. You are able to move around differently than you would be able to on your own, creating a foundation for core stability. The workout targets all of your muscles groups, but there is a lot of emphasis placed on the core.

Find out if TRX bulks you up after the break!

  • Flexibility: Through the class you are constantly stretching between different intervals. Clients who take TRX often report feeling more flexible and gaining an increased range in motion. The breaks in a TRX class are focused on lengthening muscles while also using the straps for actions like opening up chest.
  • No bulk: Like many women who start strength training, you might be concerned about bulking up. Rest assured you can put those worries aside. Kevin Symes, a former trainer forRiekes Center for Human Enhancement explains, “Using your own weight with more reps will help you to lengthen your muscles, not expand them.” Symes also reminds female clients that as long as they aren’t following the heavy weightlifting patterns of a football player, they won’t bulk up like one.
  • No shoes, no gloves, no problem: TRX does not require you to bring any equipment or wear additional accessories. You can even do the class barefoot! “As long as you have hands and feet, you’re ready to try TRX,” says Polli.
18
Oct

365 days ago………….

EDU Family

EDU FamilyPerformancEDU Facility

 

My amazing wife and I opened up PerformancEDU’s doors for the first time. It was 6 am Oct 18th 2011, the playlist was dialed and the vision brainstormed had become a reality during our first session with the Sunrise Crew.  We were fortunate enough to have 3 Trx’s, 1 slideboard, 1 airdyne bike, 3 medballs, 2 bungees, 4 hurdles and a couple ladders with about 1200 sq feet to work with. What a memorable 75 min session all of us endured and then it hit me, everything I have learned in the past 4 years through education, contacts, networking and mentors will be the push of our success at EDU.

We knew the economy is at a low point, the fact there is a gym, crossfit, or personal training studio on every other block, and a lot of the community doesn’t have the disposable income to put towards their training. But we believed in our PRODUCT, our passion and we took this as a challenge for GREATNESS!  At EDU we strive to find the VALUE in the experience each person/athlete gets out of their training. This is what drives us to be better at our craft each and every session.

During the initial breakdown of our business model, we knew it was a necessary component to get out into the local community and make contacts with local chiro’s, physical therapists, alpine coaches, alpine teams, local ski instructors, ski patrol, ski resorts and schools to build a networking pool.  With the help of these organizations, it has been a great way to cross refer, but more importantly bring continuing education to EDU on a daily basis. We have constructed a group of very smart professionals surrounding us, which only gives the client/athlete a much greater experience at EDU.

THE REASON WHY EDU IS EDU: the EDU family, supporters (locally and nationally), local community, friends and family.  EVERYONE that walks through the doors makes the EDU’s world go round. Jenny and I can not thank you enough for your support. We are both so very humbled by everyone!

Creating GREATNESS one day at a time and always keep bringing the hotness (shout out SAM JONES)!

Marc Digesti | Director of Performance at PEDU

15
Oct

Independent Ski Racing’s women to compete on World Cup without national backing.

Independent Ski Racing’s women to compete on World Cup without national backing.

By Connor Davis http://www.skinet.com

Photo by: Marcus Caston

Hailey Duke and Megan McJames never expected to be cut from the U.S. Ski Team last spring. At 27 and 25, respectively, both have top-15 World Cup finishes to their credit and have secured spots on the circuit for this coming season. It was an unpredicted turn, but the two women didn’t miss a step. They formed their own team: Independent Ski Racing.

Joining McJames and Duke on the squad are Katie Hartman and Lena Andrews. Hartman, 24, is an NCAA Division 1 All American and the current World University Games Super G champ. Andrews, 18, is the youngest, and was a US Ski Team invitee last season. She’s positioned near the top of her age rank in multiple disciplines.

Team manager Pat Andrews believes his squad has what it takes to be successful on the World Cup circuit. “This is a great group with so much potential,” he says. “The athletes’ focus and attention to every detail of their training is incredible.”

It’s not the first time World Cup racers have attempted to go it alone. After years of feuding with U.S. Ski Team managment, Bode Miller left the Team after the 2007 World Cup season and formed his own one-man squad called Team America. He has since returned to the U.S. team.

Mr. Andrews knew he’d have to find experienced coaches motivated to take on such a task, and he’s excited about head coach Helmut Krug and assistant coach Jonas Lind. “We knew we wanted coaches with both European and World Cup experience,” he says. “Fortunately were able to sign them both.”

Krug, a 20-year World Cup coaching veteran, has worked with Austrian, German, and Swedish World Cup teams. Lind was former coach of Sweden’s junior national and World Cup teams.

“I believe in letting the athletes guide themselves,” Krug says. “You get the feel for each racer and make the training fit. It’s all about doing the right thing at the right time.”

And the athletes’ motivation seems in sync with Krug’s philosophy. “I believe the customized program we’ve put together is going to allow me to build on my success to this point and achieve my ultimate goals,” says McJames. Duke agrees. “I set out on this journey to prove to myself that I can ski beyond my own expectations.”

ISR is based out of Aspen, Colorado, where they’ve teamed up with the Aspen Valley Ski Club. “Aspen hosts the only U.S.-based World Cup tech event for women,” says Mr. Andrews. “They provide some of the best hills in the nation to train on—not to mention fantastic snowmaking.”

The team is currently training on Austria’s Stubai Glacier in preparation for the World Cup opener in Sölden, Austria, at the end of October. And though the racing season has yet to begin, Mr. Andrews sees a future for maverick programs like ISR.

“We believe there will be more teams like this popping up in the future due to the financial constraints of the U.S. Ski Team. We are looking at ISR to be a long-term project.”

[Editor’s note: Independent Ski Racing is accepting donations through its fundraising wing, The Athlete Project. All funds go directly toward the team’s training, traveling, and racing expenses. The team would also like to thank its sponsors: Rossignol USA, Head USA, Fischer USA, Ski Racing Development, POC, Shred, and Swix.]

12
Oct

Passion for what we do at EDU.

Mike Balavage Ski Patrol

Mike Balavage Ski Patrol

Here is a great testimonial to what PerformancEDU is all about. Thanks MIKE!

The name PerformancEDU hints at Marc Digesti’s passion: Performing movement

… Movement performance … Educating … It’s all centered on learning how best to

BALANCE! (Balancing is a concept which I’m learning to use as a verb in its broadest,
deepest sense through Marc.)

It took an injury for me to realize just how out of balance I was. The medial
collateral ligaments in my knee threatened to jeopardize my skiing, ski instructing, ski
patrolling, golfing, as well as keeping fit and physically active. Marc’s not only helping
me heal, but he’s teaching me how to be in balance.

Young or old, whatever sport or activity, injured or striving to prevent injury, I
encourage you to try this. Marc’s got something for you. You may even more than like
it; you’ll start to live it. At PerformancEDU, you’ll learn not just how to help your body heal
itself and prevent injury, but Marc can teach you how to most efficiently and effectively
use your body for any and all activities. From simple day-to-day living, to recreational
activities, to world class athletic performance, Marc can help you learn how to live in
better balance.

Being balanced, stable and strong is truly a better way to live. Marc’s
programs are based around the core, stressing the muscles in our hips, mid-section
and shoulders to work and balance the body while it moves. My experience at
PerformancEDU is showing me how to perform at higher levels AND be less prone to
injury.

The programs are customized to the expectations, needs and wants of
each ‘student.’ On Learning Balanced Living could be a subtitle to what PerformancEDU
can do for you. Come in and expect to ski, golf, play tennis – to live — and perform
better than you ever have!

Mike Balavage

11
Oct

High Performance Dryland Training dates are SET and SCHEDULED at PerformancEDU

Mike Balavage Ski Patrol

Mike Balavage Ski Patrol

 

Are you ready to prepare yourself for the upcoming ski season? PerformancEDU has had great results the past two years with our methodology leading up to the ski season, while programing for in-season maintenance program for each of our athletes.  We have created a great network of local ski instructors, ski patrol and master’s racers. Each one of these athletes will be apart of the group and help guide the training program up and through the ski season.

The dates have been set for our High Performance Dryland Training at EDU. Sessions are scheduled to run Monday/Wednesday from 5:30 pm till 6:45.  Spots are already filling up fast, so if you are interested, please contact EDU at 775-354-8959 or email us at: mdigesti@performancedu.com.

Here is a background of our Dryland Training Program:

Welcome back for another 3 month Dryland Movement Program for the upcoming 2012-2013 season. PerformancEDU has put together a 3 month training program emphasizing three phases of training:

  • Extensive 1 Foundation Phase (Finding Stability)
  • Extensive 2 Maintain Strength and Revisit Stability
  • Intensive 1 Absolute Strength

The first session we will be testing, which includes:

  • Body composition-Body Fat Comp
  • Functional Movement screen-7 site movement assessment
  • Strength Testing:
    • Upper
    • Lower
    • Rotation
    • Metabolic

The second session will include:

  • Corrective movement breakdown from the FMS (finding compensations and implementing the correct solutions to build the compensations).
  • Breakdown of:
    • Movement Prep
    • Glute Activation
    • Nueral Activation
    • Pillar Strength
    • Elasticity

After the first two sessions of testing, education and movement breakdown, we will start into program design and get rolling with Extensive 1: Foundation Phase (Finding Stability) for the first 3 weeks. Every 3 weeks the program will evolve into the next phase.

Here is a little background of what the movements entail in the Fall Dryland Training program:

  • Corrective Movements (Pillar Strength) to address movement limitations, because if your body does not move well on land, it will not fare any better on skis. Improving hip and thoracic spine mobility will also reduce the likelihood of getting a sore back.
  • Strength Phase Create muscular strength and absolute strength. In particular, strong legs and a strong core are essential for quality skiing. This program includes a balance of hip-dominant, knee-dominant, anterior core, posterior core, rotational core, upper body pulls, and upper body pushes to make sure you are strong all over. There is also single-leg work to make sure both legs – and therefore turns both ways – are strong. Plus some lateral leg work specific to skiing, and a touch of isometric leg work to help your endure those tuck situations. The program also includes a variety of repetition ranges and holds to address pure strength, strength endurance, and eccentric strength.
  • Power/Elastic Movements help to give you that extra push when you need to either get out of a sticky situation, really get down into a sweet GS turn, and to be able to ski the bumps instead of letting them ski you.
  • A combination of anaerobic and aerobic conditioning (ESD) builds your energy system so that you have the strength-endurance to perform on individual runs, and the stamina to last all day.
  • Foam rolling and static stretching to help your body with recovery. Recovery is a crucial part of training, yet it is often overlooked. In fact recovery is an essential part of the muscle building process. Foam rolling can help to relieve tension from the areas in your muscles and fascia that have knots and trigger points, while also activating your fascia. Static stretching helps to maintain or even regain range of motion in your joints and length in your muscles and fascia. These together can help with overuse injury reduction, and with on-hill performance resulting from improved mobility.
10
Oct

High Performance Dryland Training at PerformancEDU

Perry Schaffner J2

Perry Schaffner J2

Mission Statement: PerformancEDU’s training philosophy is to examine the human body through movement and implement ways to decrease injury and increase performance. PerformancEDU evaluates the body while relating to functional movement, understands the bodies directional movement patterns, and prescribe and implement specific movements and progressions to maximize athletic performance in sport and life.

Welcome back for another 3 month Dryland Movement Program for the upcoming 2012-2013 season. PerformancEDU has put together a 3 month training program emphasizing three phases of training:

  • Extensive 1 Foundation Phase (Finding Stability)
  • Extensive 2 Maintain Strength and Revisit Stability
  • Intensive 1 Absolute Strength

The first session we will be testing, which includes:

  • Body composition-Body Fat Comp
  • Functional Movement screen-7 site movement assessment
  • Strength Testing:
    • Upper
    • Lower
    • Rotation
    • Metabolic

The second session will include:

  • Corrective movement breakdown from the FMS (finding compensations and implementing the correct solutions to build the compensations).
  • Breakdown of:
    • Movement Prep
    • Glute Activation
    • Nueral Activation
    • Pillar Strength
    • Elasticity

After the first two sessions of testing, education and movement breakdown, we will start into program design and get rolling with Extensive 1: Foundation Phase (Finding Stability) for the first 3 weeks. Every 3 weeks the program will evolve into the next phase.

Here is a little background of what the movements entail in the Fall Dryland Training program:

  • Corrective Movements (Pillar Strength) to address movement limitations, because if your body does not move well on land, it will not fare any better on skis. Improving hip and thoracic spine mobility will also reduce the likelihood of getting a sore back.
  • Strength Phase Create muscular strength and absolute strength. In particular, strong legs and a strong core are essential for quality skiing. This program includes a balance of hip-dominant, knee-dominant, anterior core, posterior core, rotational core, upper body pulls, and upper body pushes to make sure you are strong all over. There is also single-leg work to make sure both legs – and therefore turns both ways – are strong. Plus some lateral leg work specific to skiing, and a touch of isometric leg work to help your endure those tuck situations. The program also includes a variety of repetition ranges and holds to address pure strength, strength endurance, and eccentric strength.
  • Power/Elastic Movements help to give you that extra push when you need to either get out of a sticky situation, really get down into a sweet GS turn, and to be able to ski the bumps instead of letting them ski you.
  • A combination of anaerobic and aerobic conditioning (ESD) builds your energy system so that you have the strength-endurance to perform on individual runs, and the stamina to last all day.
  • Foam rolling and static stretching to help your body with recovery. Recovery is a crucial part of training, yet it is often overlooked. In fact recovery is an essential part of the muscle building process. Foam rolling can help to relieve tension from the areas in your muscles and fascia that have knots and trigger points, while also activating your fascia. Static stretching helps to maintain or even regain range of motion in your joints and length in your muscles and fascia. These together can help with overuse injury reduction, and with on-hill performance resulting from improved mobility.

If interested in joining the top athletes and instructors in the area, give us a call at: 775.354.8959 or email us at: mdigesti@performancedu.com

Creating GREATNESS in movement and LIFE!”

Regards,

Marc Digesti USAW Sports Performance | Founder of PerformancEDU

17
Aug

No more overeating or craving sweets – Primal Day 6!

Craving sweets?? Your daily diet could be to blame!

Hi Everyone!

Today I just wanted to write a quick blog and elaborate on what I said in yesterday’s post about not having my typical cravings for sweets or overeating.

Prior to doing the full-blown challenge – we had eaten a “Primal-ly based” diet … but by no means was it full-blown primal. Like I said before, we were eating a lot of non-primal foods such as condiments (full of sugar and unhealthy fats); gluten free pastas and breads; candy; tortilla chips and margs; etc. We had convinced ourselves that since we ate a lot of primal food – that it was OK to go ahead and eat these other “foods”. Of course, it is “OK” in the sense that we have the freedom to do whatever we want. However, it wasn’t benefiting our bodies at all.

Adding on to this (still Pre-primal) – every night after dinner, I would crave something sweet. Or I would just crave eating in general – despite being quite full. I could NEVER figure this out and figured it was something “mental”. I never felt good after doing this, but the craving was always extremely intense! I would try to use sheer willpower to NOT give in to my cravings…..and sometimes that would work….but mostly I would give in to these intense cravings! I tried to figure out what could be going on mentally or emotionally that was causing these intense cravings, but I couldn’t figure it out. I didn’t even stop to think that these cravings and the desire to overeat could be caused by a PHYSICAL imbalance!!

So – we have been full blown primal for 6 days now – no cheating. And I am not kidding when I say that my night-time cravings for sweets and overeating – have gone away!! What does this mean??? It means that it is HIGHLY likely that these cravings were caused NOT by a mental problem – but by the fluctuations in my blood sugar and body chemistry caused by eating foods that didn’t work well with my body. It’s like a light bulb went off in my brain and I am understanding now how much damage I was causing my poor body by eating these foods! Add on to that equation the FODMAPs – and it’s no wonder I wasn’t feeling well!!

So – it wasn’t that I had mental problems haha. My body was just trying to do the best it could do to balance my blood sugar and body chemistry. If you are someone that “eats well all day, just to come home and overeat” or “craves sweets” (and I have heard from many people having these same issues) – doing the Primal Challenge may be an eye opener for you!! I have learned A LOT about my body in this short period of time, which is much more than I expected to gain from this challenge.

So – go ahead and give it a try! It’s only 21 days! Seriously – it’s worth it!! And we are here to help!!

**please note – this is not medical advice. if you have serious concerns about your health…use your own intuition and see a doctor if necessary.

16
Aug

INCREASED bloating and abdominal pain on PRIMAL!? NO!

Bloat much?

So here we are on the Primal Challenge – Day 5. Energetically I am feeling MUCH better!! I also feel better mentally (less anxious). My cravings for sweets and overeating in general have gone away! It’s really quite awesome and leads me to believe that many of my “bad” eating habits could be attributed to an imbalanced blood sugar. Yay for Primal!!

However, with going FULL primal – I have also noticed an increase in digestive disturbances. I have struggled with digestion problems for quite some time now and could never fully figure out the cause. I was diagnosed with Celiac in 2005 and have been gluten free since – but I STILL have problems! Mainly I struggle with bloating, abdominal pain/discomfort, strange bowel patterns (diarrhea/constipation – sorry if that is TMI), etc.  When we decided to go full primal – I thought that would solve all my “problems” – so when my bloating and discomfort INCREASED I felt SO sad! However, I know that the other positive changes that I have experienced so far is all that I need to know that Primal is a step in the right direction. SO I refused to give up and decided to consult my medical practitioner – aka GOOGLE! (*Note – this is a joke. Do not depend on google for medical advice…) When I told google my concerns (increased bloating and stomach pain on primal) – I found a very useful blog about FODMAPS!

What the heck are FODMAPS you say??? Well here is the blog I found with all the detailed information…but long story short is that they are a group of sugars found in certain foods that some people have trouble digesting. The symptoms are – all of the symptoms I have been experiencing. Ha! Even some primal foods (like certain fruits and veggies) contain these FODMAPS which could be the missing piece to my digestive disturbance puzzle! Since I am already going Primal, I figured why the heck not avoid these certain foods as well?! (This blog also contains a downloadable PDF file explaining which foods to avoid if you are interested).  So all day yesterday I avoided these high FODMAP foods – and guess what??? For the first time in a very long time – I went to bed without looking pregnant and without pain (no kidding this happens almost every night…) You have no idea how much better life is when you feel good!! SO – could this be a “fluke”?? Of course it could be! But for right now…I am going to avoid/limit these high FODMAP foods and continue to eat PRIMALLY and see if I can get myself to feeling better!! My “gut” says – I can!!

Here is a recipe we came up with last night that is Primal and low FODMAP:

Much tastier than it looks!! I had already eaten 2 of these before I remembered to snap a pic! Ha!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ground Turkey

Red, Yellow, and Orange bell peppers sautéed in coconut oil and seasoned with sea salt and pepper

Black Olives

Salsa (no added sugar – read the ingredients!)

Mix all of the above and add to a lettuce wrap – roll up like a burrito.

Enjoy!!

15
Aug

Primal Eats!!

Breakfast!

Hey Everyone!

I decided to take pics of some of my eats from yesterday – so you could see some of what we’ve been eating!! I didn’t include my snacks and wasn’t particularly hungry yesterday – so the eats are pretty basic haha! But I really enjoy eating this way and feel really good!! For breakfast, I sliced a banana and an apple and mixed it with almond butter. Then I microwaved it for about a minute – which made it nice and warm and gooey (which I like). Then I topped it with some cinnamon! This was really tasty and left me satisfied until 2 pm!! I probably could have even skipped lunch but had already made my salad haha!! I also had some black coffee on the side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lemon water!!

 

 

After breakfast, I had some lemon water. I love the taste of lemon and lemons are really great for your body!! They help your liver and have a alkalizing effect on your system!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lunch!!

 

 

For lunch, I had a big green salad with romaine lettuce, cucumbers, celery, and tuna. I used olive oil, lemon juice, and sea salt for the “dressing”. This was really fresh and delicious! Like I said before, my breakfast kept me satisfied and it was 2pm before I realized I hadn’t eaten lunch yet! I wasn’t terribly hungry, but since I had already made the salad – I decided to eat it! YUM!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snack!!

 

 

I got a little hungry again (or maybe I just wanted to munch…) so I had some blueberries!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dinner!

 

 

For dinner, I wasn’t as hungry again. But still felt like eating (haha!). So I made some scrambled eggs! I cooked the eggs in REAL butter and used some sea salt as a seasoning. The butter made the eggs so tasty and so satisfying!!! That’s one of the great things about PRIMAL is that you learn that certain fats have been unfairly demonized!! Not all fats are bad – in fact – you NEED fats!! I also had another apple on the side with some cinnamon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So that gives you a little “taste” (pun intended) of the primal foods we have been eating! Like I said, there were some foods that I forgot to snap a photo of, but this gives you a basic idea. Like I said, I love this way of eating because you just eat. There isn’t any over-thinking about meal timing, portion control, calorie counting etc. It’s simple, basic food that works well for your body.

Let us know if you have any question! And thanks for reading!!!!

13
Aug

21 Day Primal Challenge!!

This is a great book!!

Hi Everyone!

You may have noticed on our Facebook page that we have decided to do the Primal Challenge!! And here we are at Day 2 of the “21 Day Primal Challenge” and I am already feeling better. The main difference that I have felt so far (even though it is so early into the challenge) is that I feel good about eating again. My appetite has picked up and I don’t feel sick to my stomach (especially in the mornings) like I used to. Like I said – I just feel excited about eating again  – which is huge for me!

Why did we decide to do the challenge?? Well for one – we are BIG supporters of the Primal Lifestyle, but we have never actually gone full-blown primal. Even in the past when we have done primal challenges, we were still using condiments (like ketchup and mayonnaise) that are certainly not primal (because they contain sugar, unhealthy oils, etc). We justified it to ourselves saying things like “oh it’s just a little bit” or “it’s not THAT bad”.  These little justifications were starting to increase lately and we were starting to eat more and more non-primal foods (gluten free pastas, gluten free breads, gluten free donuts, candy, etc). Now, I am not saying that this is “wrong” by any means – but for us it was a slippery slope into weight gain and just generally not feeling well. I know that lately, I had not been feeling the best (tired all the time, joint pain, etc.). I had also started gaining weight – which was not noticeable in my clothes – but it was definitely creeping up on me. Again – I am not saying this is BAD …it’s just something that was not working for ME. SO – we decided to make a change. I know that almost everything that I have been experiencing lately, both physically and mentally – can be attributed to our gradually worsening eating habits. Lucky for me – I can control this! Hooray!!

So – I pulled out my Primal Book and cleared out the fridge and cabinets. I got rid of all the non-primal food (spices and condiments that contained sugar/non-primal oils; gluten free bread; gluten free pasta; 7up (how did that get in there?!); juices; sweeteners, etc.) I donated what I could and threw out the rest. Drastic?? Maybe…but for me it was necessary. And let me tell you it felt SO good to clear out this stuff! Then we went to the store and stocked up on some primal fare:

Meats

Veggies

Fruits

Healthy fats (avocado, olive oil, coconut oil; nuts and nut butters (but not peanuts or peanut butter!)

What I love most about primal is that you just eat. There isn’t any calorie counting, meal timing, food combining, etc. You just eat when you’re hungry. That’s it. And that’s what works for me! When I try to do a highly specific plan – it makes me crazy and just does not work for me! (remember – you have to find what works for YOU!) Also – those urges of  “Oh My GOD I need to eat NOW” feelings have gone away. Don’t get me wrong – I definitely get hungry – but it’s a gentle hunger. It isn’t urgent. And I like that.

I’m excited to see if eating strict primal will help with my joint issues. I will keep you all posted!! If any of you are interested – I highly recommend this book! Or check out Mark Sisson’s (author of the book) website – Marks Daily Apple. Both are very informative about what it means to “Eat/Live Primal”!! Check it out! And feel free to ask questions in the comment section or on our Facebook page!!!

Hope you all are staying healthy!! And thanks for reading!!!

 

25
Jul

TRX Movements for your Lower Body and Core Strength at PerformancEDU

At PerformancEDU, Marc Digesti show us how we use the TRX as one of our main training tools. Here are 4 movements that will strengthen your lower body and core:

-TRX Squat Mobility
-TRX Lunge to hip flexion
-TRX Knee Tuck to Rotation
-TRX lateral hip drops

26
Jun

Hailey Duke no longer on Team USA, training with Independent Ski Team

21
Jun

What does “It’s a Lifestyle” really mean???

What does YOUR lifestyle entail??? :o)

What does it mean to live a certain “lifestyle”? You know…you hear it all the time: “It’s not a diet, it’s lifestyle.” But what does that mean?? Essentially there are MANY different lifestyles that you can choose to live, and the only thing that makes it “right” is if it works for YOU! So what if you are trying to get healthy or want to get your body in “optimal” shape?? Then what?? There seems to be a variety of different people with a variety of different opinions, all claiming their way to be “THE WAY”. We have found here at PerformancEDU, through personal experience, that we are happiest (in terms of the way we eat) when we focus mainly on natural, whole, REAL, foods. You may hear or see us throw around the term “primal” and we believe the primal “diet” to be a very effective tool! Initially you can use “PRIMAL” as a “technique”, but it’s not meant to be the end-all-be-all of diets. It’s not dogma. It’s not “the way”. It’s just a tool that can help you to get more in tune with the way you eat. It can help you to realize and FEEL how certain foods affect you. It can also help to bring emotional eating habits to your awareness. That’s why we are such big fans of the primal “diet”. It really is an effective tool! But if you find yourself stressing/feeling guilty over every morsel of food that passes your lips, or if after a while you are still trying to remember the “rules” – maybe it’s time to take a step back and see primal for what it really is. As I said before, the way we eat and feel the best is when we focus mostly on natural, REAL foods. The more natural the better in our eyes. But does that mean we eat that way ALL of the time! No – we are human and live in a society filled with other stuff that is pleasurable to our taste buds! We know that these types of “foods” aren’t really going to benefit our bodies, but they do benefit our minds and it’s ok (and GOOD) to loosen up and have fun from time to time.The great thing about getting in touch with YOUR body is that you will start to realize what makes you FEEL really good – both short term and long term. You will learn that sometimes the short term gratification (sour patch kids?!) is not worth the long term effect (stomach ache) – so really you will start figuring these things out and just naturally choose the foods that make you feel the best! I have a bachelor’s degree in nutrition, but honestly I don’t even use most of the knowledge that I acquired from this. Gaining health and feeling/looking amazing doesn’t have to be rocket science.

Focus on real WHOLE foods.
Move more.
Focus on feeling good.
Worry less about the details.
Stop over-analyzing and focus on the big picture.
It really is that simple.

* disclaimer: if you have a medical condition affecting your nutritional status, you will need to speak with a registered dietitian – this advice is for your average healthy person looking to get in shape and feel great

19
Jun

MUSCLE TENSION: ARE YOU TENSE?

Great article by: http://www.massageseattle.net

Muscle tension and tension related problems are very common. Feel that stiffness in your neck and upper back? In your jaw? In your hands? In your back?

Most people just think they have to live with it and it is a result of getting older. Others try to cover it up with alcohol or drugs or try to forget about it by working longer hours. Many are even too busy to notice if they are tense or if they carry muscle tension.

A muscle is supposed to work to support the joints and help move the bones to create movement. They are the bodies stabilizers and help maintain posture. The strength of a muscle depends on its ability to be flexibly as well as the ability of the muscle to relax. A muscle either works for you or against you.

A tight muscle is really just a muscle contraction that fails to release for a multitude of reasons and becomes a spasm or knot in the muscle.

You may even think that if your muscles are tight that it means they are good and strong. The facts are that tight muscles are weak muscles. This type of tension is actually unhealthy and can contribute to many other problems like headaches, plantar faciaiitis, tmj problems, herniated discs and other things like carpal tunnel syndrome. A tight muscle has a greater risk of injury when asked to move.

Muscle tension is needed to support the joints and to hold our bodies in upright positions. Tension is created when a muscle contracts. A certain amount of tension is needed – that is called muscle tone. When a muscle is not being used it should be in a relaxed state in which it feels soft and supple even. When muscle fibers remain contracted and don’t relax it creates muscle spasms, knots, reduces the circulation and even restricts the energy flow through the body.

The main causes of tension are mechanical -like sitting at your desk all day in one position or participating in sports and the other type is emotional tension. Mechanical tension includes trauma, bad posture, and things like injuries. Environmental factors can also influence muscle tension. Breathing polluted air and eating the wrong foods can influence tension.

Emotional tension is also referred to as armoring (Willhelm Riech) When emotions are not felt fully at any stage of life they can become suppressed or repressed. Repression is the unconscious prevention of feelings. Suppression is the conscious prevention of feelings. Either way, we try to protect ourselves from having deep uncomfortable feelings by tightening muscles. Layers of tension develop starting at an early age.

The two types influence each other and are related to each other. Mechanical tension can usually easily be relaxed with a few sessions of massage. Emotional tension usually requires a series of regular massage sessions coming 2x a week for a few years or even more to break through.

Some causes of mechanical tension include:
> Trauma, injuries, operations
> Bad posture and physical habits like sitting for too long
> Wearing high heels, sitting cross-legged.
> Environmental factors such as standing on concrete, constant noise, poor lighting, pollution

Some causes of emotional tension include:
> Repression of emotions at an early age in childhood
> Ignoring or being unaware of your feelings at any given moment
> Working in unfulfilling jobs or staying in unfulfilling relationships

Mechanical tension usually causes emotional tension. Emotional tension usually causes physical tension. Tension affects most every disease or condition of ill health. It cause pain and fatigue. A muscle held in chronic tension uses up energy and leads to muscle and over all fatigue. It restricts the freedom of movement. It reduces the ability to strengthen a muscle. It reduces your ability to breath deeply and efficiently.

Often there is so much tension it results in a lack of feeling in an area. Without an awareness of feeling you are more prone to injuries and disease.

Excessive tension can lead to many different diseases and conditions. It can cause pain in the muscle tissues and constrict the flow of blood and nutrients which are needed for just normal metabolism. Muscles can contract around blood vessels restricting the flow and resulting in poor circulation. A tense muscle also uses more energy and can lead to feeling fatigued. People who are tense often also take shallow breaths because the breathing mechanisms are restricted thus creating more tension. So it all becomes a viscous circle. When you are tense it can also cause a cascading effect of emotions such as anxiety and depression. It interferes with the ability to feel which is central to all aspects of life.

Getting regular massage can help alleviate mechanical and physical tension and help maintain a proper balance in the body thereby creating a healthier place to live.

Other things that can help are actually engaging in regular exercise or physical activity. This may seem contradictory in some ways but using the muscles to their fullest capacity can also help a muscle relax. When you sit at your desk with all of your shoulder and neck muscles just contracting away. Other factors also come into play when you are under stress. Chemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline are released into your body. These chemicals are the stress response hormones so when you are under stress they are preparing your body for taking physical action. Today we just continue to sit and the chemicals never get out of the body and excess amounts of these cause other problems in the body. Basically you are swimming in a toxic waste pool! Excess muscle tension can lead to knots or triggerpoints in the muscles. It is those little knots that are the cause of most of your pain and problems. They can cause pain in the spot they are located or they can cause pain in other areas of your body.

When you get too many of those knots in your muscles you then you most likely have myofascial triggerpoint syndrome.

saveyourselfmyofascialpain

Getting rid of those knots is a process of finding them and working on them with massage from a professional or from do it yourself pressure point therapy.

You can learn more about triggerpoints and myofascial pain syndrome in this handy Ebook tutorial “Save Yourself from Myofacial Pain Syndrome”from a fellow massage therapist – Paul Ingram. You can download it directly to your computer!

17
Jun

PerformancEDU Newest Equipment Addition: Keiser PT

ImageExperience total versatility, at any speed! Unilaterally and bilaterally work any muscle group safely at any angle, at any resistance, at any speed through the range of motion. Resistance is always consistent, unaffected by speed of exercise. By utilizing the power of Keiser’s free moving pneumatic technology you can safely increase your power output as speed increases. This allows for intense functional workouts with zero shock load to muscles, connective tissues and joints.

Perfect for group, target, and core stability training! With multi user lines like the Infinity Six Pack and Triple Trainer you can use one machine to provide a workout that would take 9 machines from anyone else. Even better, the machines can serve every body type that may use your facility. Short, tall, male, female, husky, slender, all body shapes and sizes are comfortable using this equipment.

Keiser machines fit a wide range of needs! Physical therapists long ago discovered Keiser equipment. It is ideal for everyone, from the orthopedic patient through the performance athlete. Countless professional sports teams, performance training facilities, sports medicine professionals, researchers, older adult fitness centers, senior living communities, corporate fitness centers, and physical therapists trust the Keiser brand.

http://www2.keiser.com/en/machines/infinity/infinity/Performance_Trainer

16
Dec

MBSC Voted #1 in America for 2013

Originally posted on Michael Boyle's Strengthcoach.com Blog:

Once again Mike Boyle Strength and Conditioning has been voted the best gym in America. Men’s Health named us America’s top gym in 2010 and now The Active Times has declared us the best in 2013.  I can’t say it any better than editor Katie Rosenbrock from Active Times did:

“Athletes who train at MBSC have access to some of the best performance enhancing training programs and personal trainers in the entire country. Mike Boyle’s influence reaches far beyond the gym’s three Massachusetts locations though. With a blog full of valuable training tips and an informative podcast that shares many of the renowned gym’s fundamentals with athletes and fitness professionals all over the world, MBSC is much more than just a gym. Dubbed the fitness facility with the most knowledgeable staff by one reader, this gym earned our number one spot not only because of its top-notch staff, but also…

View original 26 more words

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